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Charlotte

Charlotte

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Charlotte

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New family practice opens in Eaton Rapids

Health care providers from Charlotte Medical Group and Family Care Specialists in Charlotte have expanded their family medicine practice to Eaton Rapids as One Team Family Health.

In addition to their current practices, Kimberly Friar, M.D., from Charlotte Medical Group, and Todd Otten, M.D., and Julie Coenen, N.P., from Family Care Specialists are now scheduling patients at the new Eaton Rapids location at 1415 S. Main Street, Suite C, in front of the Family Fare grocery store.

“We care for quite a few Eaton Rapids patients in our Charlotte practices,” said Dr. Friar. “Our new location provides additional flexibility and scheduling options for those patients, as well as any local residents who are looking for a primary care provider in that area.”

One Team Family Health is accepting new patients. The office is currently open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Tuesday through Friday. Dr. Friar sees patients Tuesdays, Dr. Otten sees patients Wednesdays and Fridays, and Ms. Coenen sees patients Thursdays. The other days of the week the providers will continue to schedule patients in their Charlotte offices. Call (517) 663-4809 if you have any questions or to schedule an appointment in Eaton Rapids.

The One Team Family Health practice manages care for patients of all ages. In addition to preventive medicine the providers specialize in men’s and women’s health, pediatrics, obesity management and diabetes. It collaborates with local health care services to provide comprehensive, convenient care. The practice also accepts same day appointments for more urgent medical needs.

“I enjoy getting to know my patients and helping them best manage their health throughout the various stages of life,” Dr. Otten said. “I look forward to meeting many more families as we grow our practice in Eaton Rapids.”

Dr. Friar lives in Charlotte, Mich., with her husband Michael, who works in Eaton Rapids, and their four daughters. She has been practicing family medicine for more than 20 years. She enjoys coaching high school girls basketball, CrossFit at AL!VE, and is making a return to triathlon training. She is a cofounder of the Touching Souls Foundation, and most loves spending time with her family.

Dr. Otten lives in Dimondale, Mich., with his wife Angie , and their four children. He has been family medicine for more than 20 years, and was previously a Navy flight surgeon. He enjoys sports, especially playing and coaching soccer.

Julie Coenen, N.P., lives in Charlotte, Mich., with her husband Kent and their two daughters.  Coenen has been a nurse for more than 25 years. She is currently working toward her Advance Practice R.N. Certificate in Palliative Care.  After 32 years in the military, Coenen retired in 2014 as Chief Nurse of the 110th Medical Group of the 110th Fighter Wing, Battle Creek, Mich.  She served in Desert Storm and Iraqi Freedom and retired as a lieutenant colonel. She enjoys spending time with her family and volunteering with her church group.

Article submitted by One Team Family Health. 

Olivet

Olivet

Featured Story

Olivet trap shooting team celebrates successful first season

For the first time in the history of Olivet Community Schools, students have the opportunity to join a trap shooting team. Saturday, June 17 the 27-student strong team attended the state trap shooting tournament. Part of the USA High School Clay Target League, Olivet competed against 22 other Michigan teams and placed fifth. With a handful of other notable placements in the tournament, Jamie Bartley is proud of the team’s accomplishments in its first season.

Bartley was one of a few Olivet Eagle dads who saw the potential for an Olivet Community Schools Trap shooting team. They had heard about the sport growing in Michigan, which is one of about 20 states around the country that participate in the USA High School Clay Target League. Bartley started doing his research. He and the other dads wanted to see what it would take to get Olivet students such an opportunity.

“Some kids don’t do contact sports,” said Bartley.

Out of the 27 student participants, Bartley noted that several were not involved in contact sports of any kind. The trap shooting team provided an entirely new area for kids to get out of the house after school and be involved in something. The new sport also gave kids with previous gun and hunting experience another avenue in which to be involved. Some of the teammates had been shooting since they were little kids, according to Bartley.

Previous experience was noticeable among some of the students. Levi and Ty Krauss were two exceptional shooters on the team who also participate in other scholastic shooting events. Bartley was highly impressed by the improvement of the new shooters on the team as well. One of the novice teammates, Nathan Powers placed second out of 87 in the novice division, hitting 87 out of 100 shots. The state tournament brought several “firsts” out the students. Daniel Higgins shot his first 50 in a row on Saturday, and Bartley’s son Gavin shot 25 in a row and placed third in his division for hitting 95 out of 100 shots.

The progress of the team in its first season is exciting for Bartley and the other coaches and dads involved. Already they have students and parents asking about joining for the next season, registration for which will begin August 1. Trap shooting is also a rapidly growing sport across the country and in Michigan especially. Last year the Michigan State High School Clay Target League had seven teams. This year Olivet was one of about 20 schools in the league, and at Saturday, June 17 state tournament it was announced that there are an expected 40 more Michigan schools to join the league in the next season.

Bartley sees the great potential for students who are involved in trap shooting. Colleges with trap shooting teams, like Hillsdale College (which won a division three national title for its trap shooting team), offer scholarships to top-notch trap shooters.

The Olivet trap shooting team is like every other team at the school. Students are expected to attend one of the two weekly practices, they’re expected to keep their grades up, and student safety is paramount. The team is coed, and currently involves students from grades eight through 12. All students who pass their online certification or hunter safety course are allowed to participate.

And like other teams, the trap shooting team is in need of sponsors. There are currently no school dollars going to the team. Bartley hopes for more contributions in the future. Likewise, Bartley and the other coaches and dads are hoping for more student participation.

Bellevue

Bellevue

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Bellevue historians disappointed over loss of township building

Tucked away in a back corner of the Bellevue Township Library is a room filled with historical documents, clothing, knickknacks, furniture, and more. This room is home to the Bellevue Historical Society.

This group of Bellevue locals, many who spent their whole lives in Bellevue, look over the room and its contents as well as the legacy of their beloved village. Like many others, these folks have watched the change in Bellevue, often with disappointment.

In the July 1 edition of the paper, the County Journal ran an article about the Bellevue Township building, which is to be torn down to accommodate a drive through for the Fruin Pharmacy. Although nothing at this point can be done to change the coming adjustment to the face of Bellevue’s downtown, representatives from the Bellevue Historical Society still want readers to understand how such changes affect the character of the village.

Bellevue was the first of many things in Eaton County, according to Joyce Miller, and had several defining characteristics. One of the defining characteristics was the Burt Portland Cement Plant in Bellevue, which provided the cement for the bank building that was erected in the 1920s. While the Bellevue Township building (formerly the bank) isn’t nice marble, its material is still representative of the legacy and character of Bellevue.

Miller believes that the building, for having a historic designation, wasn’t maintained properly. She believes there would be no need for the township to find a different space to work from if it had been maintained the way it was supposed to be.

President of the Bellevue Historical Society, John Dexter, sees the loss of the township building as part of a growing trend. As larger corporations and companies settle in new areas small towns are often faced with the choice to preserve historic focal points, or allow stable businesses to expand.

“Almost every small town is losing businesses in some way or another,” said John.

It’s unfortunate to John, but ultimately he acknowledged the predicament Bellevue is faced with. But as historians of the oldest Eaton County Village, John and Joyce know the hard truth that once it’s gone, it’s gone forever.

Like many other residents, John and Joyce are at a loss of ideas for what to do to preserve Bellevue’s historic downtown while also keeping visitors interested and coming back. They hope the trend stops with the township building, and they hope even more that other citizens will take on the concern and interest for local history.

Eaton County

Eaton County

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Simpson, Harris receive Eaton Count Fair’s Emerald Award

Two Eaton County men were honored Tuesday, July 11 for their longtime dedication to youth at the Eaton County Fair. Max Simpson and Roger Harris were each presented with the 2017 Emerald Award during a special presentation at Kardel Hall.

Max was instrumental in building the Eaton County tractor pulls into the kind of event audiences from the area enjoy today. His involvement with the fair and tractor pulls began in the 1970s and has remained constant since.

“Max’s work has resulted in Eaton County being voted pull of the year in the State of Michigan numerous times,” said Brian Cain, Eaton County Fair Board member, reading Max’s nomination letter. “It takes a lot of good volunteers to make these pulls happen, but it is Max’s foresight and leadership that has made this pull what it is today.”

“If it wasn’t for the people that I had to help me, it never would have happened,” Max said. “The two people that were the most help to me were my wife, Sandy, and Tim Babcock, who were always there.”

Roger has been involved with the swine at the fair for 27 years, and has raised three children through Eaton County 4-H. He became the superintendent for swine at the Fair four years ago.

“Roger Harris, and (his wife) Cindy, both go out of their way to help the kids any way they can,” said Clarence Humphrey, who presented Roger with the award. “They don’t do it for recognition for themselves, they do it to help the kids. He doesn’t only tell the kids what he can do, he will do it.”

Max and Roger each received an engraved plaque and lifetime passes to the Eaton County Fair.

Vermontville

Vermontville

Featured Story

Byler shares passion for archery at Whispering Pines

Nathan Byler still fondly recalls the first deer he ever harvested with his bow. Only 13 years old at the time, he remembers being slightly off his mark as the first arrow he ever launched at a deer sailed harmlessly by. Undeterred, he was given a second opportunity when a larger deer crossed his path. This time, he didn’t miss.

The experience ignited a passion for bow hunting, one he’s translated into his own business — Whispering Pines Archery.

Open since 2014, Byler focuses his energy on getting his clients to the next level in shooting.

“I know how it is to be frustrated with archery,” Byler said. “If I don’t help my customers shoot better, I didn’t accomplish my goal.”

Offering everything a bow hunter would need for their compound bow or crossbow, Whispering Pines Archery places an emphasis on properly setting up and tuning each bow they sell or service.

“I stand behind the products I sell and behind my work,” Byler said. “I want to make sure the bow is tuned right and is the right fit for the archer.”

Ensuring his customers are set up with good flight is Byler’s top priority.

“I keep my tuning fees reasonable so people will want to have their bow property tuned,” he said.

Whispering Pines Archery offers a wide range of bows, arrows, quivers, targets and accessories. Nestled in the wood off of Valley Highway in Vermontville, the archery shop also has a range for customers to try out a bow before they buy.

Whispering Pines Archery is located at 8850 Valley Highway in Vermontville, and is open Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Byler said after hours appointments are also available to those who cannot make it during normal business hours. For more information, call (517) 726-0518.

Potterville

Potterville

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Potterville

Featured Story

Interim Superintendent selected for Potterville Schools

In early July the Potterville school board appointed an interim superintendent for the school district. Tom Pillar, a retired superintendent from Waverly schools, is set to fill the interim role until the summer of 2018, by which point the Potterville school board hopes to have a candidate to fill the position permanently.

The need for an interim superintendent follows after former superintendent Tim Donahue resigned from his position in May of 2017. Donahue resigned from his position due to a new employment opportunity with Buchanan Public Schools. According to school board president, Stacey Sipes, Donahue had been open to the possibility of a new superintendent position for a couple of years.

Donahue started as an interim superintendent at Potterville schools in 2006, before moving into the permanent role. Because the Potterville school board had not done a thorough search, interview, and hiring process for a superintendent for over ten years, the current board decided to appoint someone temporarily to the role so there would be ample time to find a suitable candidate.

Upon deciding to take more time and care in selecting a new superintendent, the board next decided to seek the aid of an executive search service, which is a common standard according to Sipes. The Michigan Association of School Boards is providing the search service for Potterville schools, which is an organization interim superintendent Pillar has worked closely with.

In moving forward with the search process Sipes indicated a few things the school board is looking for in a candidate. Ample knowledge and experience with budget, ability to draw and retain staff members, and ability to conform to the needs of a smaller school district and community are a few of the basic characteristics for a desired superintendent. Quality leadership skills are generally what the board is seeking out for the district.

The school board, however, acknowledges that this is a community decision, according to Sipes. She and other board members are eager to hear from members of the Potterville community via online surveys, town hall style forums, fall conferences, and more. Sipes encourages all members of the community, parents of current students or not,  jbring forward input. She also hopes to include Michigan Association of School Boards on the upcoming conversations and forums.

To learn more about the Potterville superintendent search and how to be involved in that process, readers are encouraged to visit the Potterville Public Schools website and locate the school board member contact information.

Eaton Rapids

Eaton Rapids

Latest

Eaton Rapids

Featured Story

New family practice opens in Eaton Rapids

Health care providers from Charlotte Medical Group and Family Care Specialists in Charlotte have expanded their family medicine practice to Eaton Rapids as One Team Family Health.

In addition to their current practices, Kimberly Friar, M.D., from Charlotte Medical Group, and Todd Otten, M.D., and Julie Coenen, N.P., from Family Care Specialists are now scheduling patients at the new Eaton Rapids location at 1415 S. Main Street, Suite C, in front of the Family Fare grocery store.

“We care for quite a few Eaton Rapids patients in our Charlotte practices,” said Dr. Friar. “Our new location provides additional flexibility and scheduling options for those patients, as well as any local residents who are looking for a primary care provider in that area.”

One Team Family Health is accepting new patients. The office is currently open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Tuesday through Friday. Dr. Friar sees patients Tuesdays, Dr. Otten sees patients Wednesdays and Fridays, and Ms. Coenen sees patients Thursdays. The other days of the week the providers will continue to schedule patients in their Charlotte offices. Call (517) 663-4809 if you have any questions or to schedule an appointment in Eaton Rapids.

The One Team Family Health practice manages care for patients of all ages. In addition to preventive medicine the providers specialize in men’s and women’s health, pediatrics, obesity management and diabetes. It collaborates with local health care services to provide comprehensive, convenient care. The practice also accepts same day appointments for more urgent medical needs.

“I enjoy getting to know my patients and helping them best manage their health throughout the various stages of life,” Dr. Otten said. “I look forward to meeting many more families as we grow our practice in Eaton Rapids.”

Dr. Friar lives in Charlotte, Mich., with her husband Michael, who works in Eaton Rapids, and their four daughters. She has been practicing family medicine for more than 20 years. She enjoys coaching high school girls basketball, CrossFit at AL!VE, and is making a return to triathlon training. She is a cofounder of the Touching Souls Foundation, and most loves spending time with her family.

Dr. Otten lives in Dimondale, Mich., with his wife Angie , and their four children. He has been family medicine for more than 20 years, and was previously a Navy flight surgeon. He enjoys sports, especially playing and coaching soccer.

Julie Coenen, N.P., lives in Charlotte, Mich., with her husband Kent and their two daughters.  Coenen has been a nurse for more than 25 years. She is currently working toward her Advance Practice R.N. Certificate in Palliative Care.  After 32 years in the military, Coenen retired in 2014 as Chief Nurse of the 110th Medical Group of the 110th Fighter Wing, Battle Creek, Mich.  She served in Desert Storm and Iraqi Freedom and retired as a lieutenant colonel. She enjoys spending time with her family and volunteering with her church group.

Article submitted by One Team Family Health. 

Sunfield

Sunfield

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Mulliken

Mulliken

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Dimondale

Dimondale

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