Select Page

More

Latest

Blog Posts

latest

Help me demonstrate the power of hope

There is tremendous power in hope. It can lift you up in moments of despair, carry you through life’s struggles and give you strength to move forward. Hope is the central theme surrounding the American Cancer Society’s...

Read The County Journal Online

Click to open a full digital copy of the newspaper that you can “flip” through online. Works on mobile devices! Read Digital Edition

Charlotte

Charlotte

Featured Story

Governor urges local leaders to keep the momentum going in Charlotte

Governor Rick Snyder visited Charlotte Thursday, Nov. 9 to take part in a graduation ceremony recognizing the City of Charlotte’s completion of the Governor’s Project Rising Tide program. The Governor congratulated city leaders on accomplishments within the community over the course of the last two years, but urged community members to keep moving forward.

“This is not the end of something when you talk about a graduation,” Snyder said. “This is a milestone we should celebrate, that the community should celebrate doing great things together. CharlotteRising is just an awesome program, and I know it goes with great pride in the community.”

Going forward, Snyder said it’s important to keep the momentum Project Rising Tide has helped generate.

“Don’t take your foot off the gas,” You’re accelerating. Now is not the time to be complacent or content about this. Just keep going as fast and forward as you can.”

Charlotte Mayor Tim Lewis assured the Governor that the Charlotte community is poised to continue its focus on downtown revitalization.

“Over the past two years what we’ve seen is our community stepping forward,” Lewis said.

“What I see is great enthusiasm for our continuation downtown. We see buildings changing currently, we see ownership changing, we see building structures changing, we see paintings of buildings and upgrading of buildings downtown. It’s a wonderful time.”

Since Project Rising Tide was instituted in Charlotte, downtown has seen five renovations completed, six business improvements, seven new businesses started and 13 renovation projects currently underway.

Snyder said the purpose of Project Rising Tide was to be catalyst in some of the smaller communities in the state.

CharlotteRising executive director Dillon Rush touched on the how the project succeeded in its mission in Charlotte, serving as a catalyst for change that community members could sense was on the horizon, but needed a push in the right direction to make tangible change a reality.

“The impact of Project Rising Tide and CharlotteRising is felt on our streets, sidewalks, storefronts, and, most importantly, in our stories of Charlotte,” Rush said. “It’s through Project Rising Tide that CharlotteRising was formed. The empowering guidance from the Project Rising Tide team focused our community to enhance our downtown and better collaborate amongst our separate organizations to work as one. Through that collaboration, CharlotteRising formed with the mission to cultivate a vibrant and enduring downtown—and we are well on our way to doing just that.”

Snyder added that he will look for Charlotte to be a role model for the next wave of Project Rising Tide communities.

Olivet

Olivet

Latest

Olivet

Featured Story

Olivet Bands receive top ratings and placements in competitions

Saturday, Oct. 7 was a chaotic, wet, and triumphant day for the Olivet High School marching band. According to band director Dave Funk, the roughly 100-student band weathered (no pun intended) storms, a bus breaking down, and no warm up before the Vicksburg Invitational. The band arrived, performed, left, and then unloaded their equipment in the rain. Challenges aside, the band was outstanding.

The Olivet marching band scored a 90, won every caption of the competition, and took first place in their class C division. What’s more is this year was the band’s first time attending the Vicksburg Invitational. Like a battle hardened troop the band arrived to the festival, kicked butt, and left. (Mic drop)

“The kids did a great job, and I was proud of how they handled the adversity of the day,” said Funk.

He was humbly impressed with his students. They acted and performed professionally through all of the day’s obstacles, and he believes they’re as ready as they can be for their next and final competition of the season.

Saturday, Oct. 21 the Olivet marching band is participating in a marching festival at East Kentwood High School. Olivet has attended the East Kentwood festival for several years, and every couple of years they step up their game. According to Funk, Olivet is one of the only bands of their size in the Class A division at the East Kentwood festival. The other bands in that division outnumber them by up to 50 to 100 students.

“We finished second last year. That allows us to play second from the end,” said Funk. “I’m really excited we can go second from the end. We’ve never had that before. Getting to play at the end of the night really makes a difference.”

Taking second place in their division was indeed a big feat for the smaller band, but Funk sees that accomplishment and the band’s many other accomplishments as well within their ability.

“My philosophy is these kids aren’t any different than any other kids. Whether we win an award or not, I just want them to go out and see how they compete against these big schools.”

The Olivet High School marching band is competing at East Kentwood High School at 8 p.m. Saturday October 21. While they’ll be performing for a crowd of about 4,000 people by Funk’s estimate, visitors from back home are welcome to make the hour drive to see them compete.

“A huge part of our success this year has been the band boosters,” said Funk. “I can’t thank them enough.”

In November the band will be traveling to Disney World to march in a parade, participate in a recording workshop, and enjoy the southern weather. To learn more about the Olivet bands and to keep up with what they’re doing, readers are encouraged to like the Olivet Band Facebook page.

Advertisement: Readers: since many ads are from outside the local area, please know what you are buying before sending money.

Bellevue

Bellevue

Featured Story

Broncos, Lions advance to MHSAA district finals

Bellevue and Maple Valley high school football teams advance to the District finals in their respective divisions with home wins Friday, Oct. 27.

The Broncos handled Webberville for the second time this season, winning their 8-Player Div. 1 pre-district contest, 48-8. Bellevue advanced to host Lawrence High School on Friday, Nov. 3. Lawrence is 5-5 on the season. They defeated Camden Frontier 24-20 to advance to the District final showdown against Bellevue. Camden Frontier handed Bellevue its only loss on the season.

Maple Valley defeated Hartford 26-7 to set up a Div. 7 showdown at Saugatuck High School on Friday, Nov. 3. Saugatuck defeated Springport High School 47-21 to move to 7-3 on the season.

Olivet High School suffered just its second loss of the season Friday, Oct. 27, falling to Lansing Catholic Central 42-20 in a Div. 5 pre-district showdown in Olivet. The Eagles finished the season with an 8-2 record and a Greater Lansing Athletic Conference championship.

Advertisement: Readers: since many ads are from outside the local area, please know what you are buying before sending money.

Eaton County

Eaton County

Latest

Eaton County

Featured Story

9-1-1 surcharge on the Nov. ballot: What readers should know

On the November ballot for Eaton County residents will be the proposal for a surcharge of up to $1.75 a month on all phone lines or devices capable of calling 9-1-1 in Eaton County. The purpose of the surcharge is to cover the cost of new radio systems for all emergency responders.
Presentations about the ballot item were given to at least two city councils in Eaton County Monday, Oct. 23. Eaton County’s Central Dispatch director, Michael Armitage, gave a presentation before the Charlotte City Council, and deputy director, Lara O’Brien, presented to the Eaton Rapids City Council.
The emergency radio system used for all of Eaton County’s emergency responders is well out of date. The system is more than 40 years old and has a number of weaknesses that are hampering responders’ ability to perform their jobs effectively. Radios connected to the system are known to lose reception in a variety of buildings, there are recurring problems with frequency overlap and interference between Eaton and Ingham Counties and even Chicago, and it is far easier for citizens to tap into the radio frequencies of emergency responders. According to O’Brien, replacement parts for the current system will no longer be in production after 2018. The list of issues with the decades old system goes on.
Counties across the state have been moving to updated, digital radio systems that almost completely eliminate problems of interference and loss of reception. The move is part of national compliance and all agencies are expected to be on the updated systems by 2021.
According to Armitage, a radio work group was started two years ago to examine some of the problems emergency responders have had with the radios. The system the work group decided would be most effective for Eaton County’s needs is the MPSCS. The new radio system will also be able to use already existing radio towers in the county, although two more towers will be built if the proposal is voted in. The upkeep of the MPSCS infrastructure will also be maintained by the state. The new radio system also includes new technologies like GPS to track radio users, and emergency call buttons in case an emergency responder is unable to talk.
Other agencies outside the county will also be able to use the system, and vice versa. Likewise, if one county’s communications go down, another county will be able to dispatch the calls. This kind of county and agency interconnectedness was previously not possible with older radio systems.
Charlotte Police Chief Lisa Sherman was available for comment and noted the most important tool she has while she’s on duty is not her firearm, but her radio. She commented that it was time for the change.
“The current system is ready to collapse,” said Kent Austin, chair of the public safety committee for the Eaton County Board of Commissioners.
The upgrade to would cost an estimated $12.8 million, and is expected to be paid off in 10 years if the surcharge proposal passes. Armitage and O’Brien clearly outlined the restrictions of the surcharge in their presentations. Funds from the 911 surcharge can only be used for the radio system upgrade, and are not part of the general fund. There is also a cap, so the charge cannot rise past $1.75, but can only be voted to decrease with each year after its approval.
For more information, readers are encouraged to contact Eaton County Central Dispatch by calling (517) 543-3510.

Advertisement: Readers: since many ads are from outside the local area, please know what you are buying before sending money.

Vermontville

Vermontville

Featured Story

Broncos, Lions advance to MHSAA district finals

Bellevue and Maple Valley high school football teams advance to the District finals in their respective divisions with home wins Friday, Oct. 27.

The Broncos handled Webberville for the second time this season, winning their 8-Player Div. 1 pre-district contest, 48-8. Bellevue advanced to host Lawrence High School on Friday, Nov. 3. Lawrence is 5-5 on the season. They defeated Camden Frontier 24-20 to advance to the District final showdown against Bellevue. Camden Frontier handed Bellevue its only loss on the season.

Maple Valley defeated Hartford 26-7 to set up a Div. 7 showdown at Saugatuck High School on Friday, Nov. 3. Saugatuck defeated Springport High School 47-21 to move to 7-3 on the season.

Olivet High School suffered just its second loss of the season Friday, Oct. 27, falling to Lansing Catholic Central 42-20 in a Div. 5 pre-district showdown in Olivet. The Eagles finished the season with an 8-2 record and a Greater Lansing Athletic Conference championship.

Advertisement: Readers: since many ads are from outside the local area, please know what you are buying before sending money.

Potterville

Potterville

Latest

Potterville

Featured Story

Interim Superintendent selected for Potterville Schools

In early July the Potterville school board appointed an interim superintendent for the school district. Tom Pillar, a retired superintendent from Waverly schools, is set to fill the interim role until the summer of 2018, by which point the Potterville school board hopes to have a candidate to fill the position permanently.

The need for an interim superintendent follows after former superintendent Tim Donahue resigned from his position in May of 2017. Donahue resigned from his position due to a new employment opportunity with Buchanan Public Schools. According to school board president, Stacey Sipes, Donahue had been open to the possibility of a new superintendent position for a couple of years.

Donahue started as an interim superintendent at Potterville schools in 2006, before moving into the permanent role. Because the Potterville school board had not done a thorough search, interview, and hiring process for a superintendent for over ten years, the current board decided to appoint someone temporarily to the role so there would be ample time to find a suitable candidate.

Upon deciding to take more time and care in selecting a new superintendent, the board next decided to seek the aid of an executive search service, which is a common standard according to Sipes. The Michigan Association of School Boards is providing the search service for Potterville schools, which is an organization interim superintendent Pillar has worked closely with.

In moving forward with the search process Sipes indicated a few things the school board is looking for in a candidate. Ample knowledge and experience with budget, ability to draw and retain staff members, and ability to conform to the needs of a smaller school district and community are a few of the basic characteristics for a desired superintendent. Quality leadership skills are generally what the board is seeking out for the district.

The school board, however, acknowledges that this is a community decision, according to Sipes. She and other board members are eager to hear from members of the Potterville community via online surveys, town hall style forums, fall conferences, and more. Sipes encourages all members of the community, parents of current students or not,  jbring forward input. She also hopes to include Michigan Association of School Boards on the upcoming conversations and forums.

To learn more about the Potterville superintendent search and how to be involved in that process, readers are encouraged to visit the Potterville Public Schools website and locate the school board member contact information.

Advertisement: Readers: since many ads are from outside the local area, please know what you are buying before sending money.

Eaton Rapids

Eaton Rapids

Featured Story

P&K RV has advice for winterizing trailers and RVs

It’s been a successful year of sales at P&K RV. The regular hustle and bustle of the spring season brought new and old customers back to the Eaton Rapids business for trailers and RVs. 2017 is settling down to be a fairly regular, steady year, according to owner George Chemacki.

As another year winds down, however, that means 2018 will be here before we know it, and P&K is preparing for another RV show at the MSU Pavilion. The end of the year also means it’s time to winterize campers and RVs.

Chemacki and Dave Pennell, owners of P&K RV have advice for readers about crucial steps for winterizing campers and RVs. The first note for any RV owner is to properly prep the hot water heater and water lines. Water needs to be completely drained prior to winter storage. Any remaining water could settle, freeze, and damage water lines. P&K RV recommends pumping antifreeze through the lines as opposed to air, and P&K is willing to do the work of pumping the antifreeze for customers.

Another often-overlooked step in the winterizing process is using a proper cover. George warns readers against using polypropylene covers, which can be a cheaper option for camper covers. The largest problem with the polypropylene covers is that they don’t breathe. They hold in moisture and will allow mold to grow in between the cover and the camper.

George’s next piece of advice was similar to the second. George recommends getting on top of the camper prior to winter storage and checking all of the caulk. Seal leaks can be a silent killer of RVs and campers. Checking over the trailer before covering it up for winter can save time, money, and hassle before that first big camping trip of the summer.

George realizes, however, there are those daring souls who camp late into fall and even winter. Although most campgrounds will close for winter, there are still a handful that will stay open year round. If winter/cool weather camping is something you do, George has a few more recommendations.

For winter camping it’s wise to have an enclosed underbelly and heated plumbing. There are some winter campers who will simply not use their plumbing for a winter trip, but for those who may want running water George highly recommends heated plumbing. At P&K RV readers and customers can find camper/RV options with winter packages.

Readers who may be looking for a new rig for next year’s camping season will want to visit P&K RV, or visit their booth at the January RV show at the MSU Pavilion. Exact dates are still in the works for the show, but P&K will be one of four dealers at the mid-January show. George encourages readers to come out and see the many options available for all budgets.

Those interested in learning more about P&K RV can visit pkrvsales.com, or call (517) 663-1300. P&K RV is located at 2334 S. Michigan Road in Eaton Rapids.

Sunfield

Sunfield

Latest

Mulliken

Mulliken

Latest
Sorry, No Posts Found

Dimondale

Dimondale

Latest

Pin It on Pinterest