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A few reasons when we only need one

By Adam Droscha Contributing Writer Two weekends ago during Charlotte’s annual Frontier Days Parade watchers likely noticed many usual sights — marching bands, horses, tractors, fire trucks, children waving from their floats,...

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Charlotte

Charlotte

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Charlotte

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Dance Studio takes on Detroit

Isabelle Whiting
Contributing Writer

The Dance Studio from Charlotte will travel to Detroit to dance pre-game at the Detroit Pistons game on Jan. 11, at 7 p.m., for the third year in a row. This year, the theme of their dance is “music” with their costumes half black and half white to look like the keys on a piano. There are 16 total dancers ranging in age from 11 to 25.
Bella Trevino, a freshman dancer, has been with The Dance Studio for nine years and said she loves going on trips with other dancers.
“I have gone on at least six trips with the studio, including Disneyland, Cedar Point, Sugar Bowl and all three trips to Pistons games,” Bella said. “I enjoy going on trips because it makes me fall in love with dance all over again.
“It is also a good way to get new experiences and, in some cases, work with other teachers to get someone else’s perspective. The best part of trips is the people you do them with. You get a chance to get to know other dancers and get closer to the ones you already do know.”
Abigail Bauer, a sophomore dancer, started dancing at the studio this past fall and is going on her first trip with the studio.
“I like the dance studio because it’s a very nice and open environment that is a place to express who you are while being able to have fun,” Abigail said. “I’m not really sure what the best part of going on the trips are because I’ve not been on a trip with the Dance Studio yet, but I do think that one of the best parts is dancing with people my own age and being able to mess around with them and hang out with them before and after we perform.”
The dancers started rehearsing in early November to put the dance together. They spent an hour and a half to two hours every Sunday to learn and fix the dance. They even spent a whole rehearsal learning how to do their own black and white, music-themed makeup.

Olivet

Olivet

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Leanna Lindsey earns 2019 Youth Achievement Award

Carla Bumstead
Editor

The 74th annual Christmas Children’s Luncheon was held Dec. 11 at the Eaton Area Senior Center. The event was hosted by Eaton County Juvenile Court and staff from the Eaton County Youth Facility. The highlight of the gathering was the presentation of the 2019 Youth Achievement Award. This year, that honor went to Leanna Lindsey of Olivet.
Leanna was nominated for the award by youth facility aftercare coordinator Jill Pugh and juvenile probation officer Lauren Whitaker. Pugh introduced Leanna to the luncheon attendees and spoke of the many reasons she deserved this year’s award.
Leanna is 16 years old and is a junior at Olivet High School, where she gets As and Bs. Pugh said she is currently in foster care in Olivet, where she is thriving. Her foster parents plan to file for guardianship of her in the future. Her younger brother also lives in the same home.
Pugh explained that Leanna first became involved with the juvenile court in October of 2016. She was put on probation and was eventually placed in the county’s community-based treatment program. The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) eventually became involved, with investigations regarding protective services allegations. Leanna was then placed with DHHS as a “neglect ward.” It was this DHHS involvement that led to her being placed in foster care.
Pugh said Leanna is a member of FFA (Future Farmers of America), attends a church group and volunteers in the community. She also recently got her driver’s license.
“We always knew Leanna could thrive in a setting where she felt safe, supported and cared for,” Pugh said. “Leanna is a caring and loving person, and it is my honor to nominate her for this award.”
After coming up to the stage to accept her award, Leanna told the crowd, “I am not very good at public speaking.” But then she proceeded to speak very eloquently of her appreciation for all those who have helped her over the past few years.

Others honored
The Honorable Thomas K. Byerly — chief judge for the county probate, circuit and district courts — served as the event emcee. It was a full house, with approximately 130 in attendance. Attendees included staff from the various Eaton County court offices, area municipal leaders and community members.
Prior to the presentation of the Youth Achievement Award, three employees were recognized for their efforts and named the Michigan Juvenile Detention Association Child Care Workers of the Year. They were Lauren Fisk, Joheather Grant and Doug Sherman.

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Bellevue

Bellevue

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Bronco basketball teams look to cap off perfect regular seasons

The road to perfect regular seasons for both the Bellevue boys and girls varsity basketball teams could go through Athens. 

The Bronco boys were 18-0 heading into its toughest remaining regular season test, a Friday, Feb. 22 showdown at Athens High School. Bellevue defeated Athens, which was undefeated at the time, earlier this season, 68-62 in Bellevue. The game could be much more difficult in a hostile environment.

The Lady Broncos, meanwhile, host Athens on Tuesday, Feb. 26. Bellevue defeated Athens on the road in their tightest contest of the season, 37-36. The girls were 16-0 heading into their game at Climax on Thursday, Feb. 21. Bellevue defeated Climax 49-15 at home earlier this season.

In their most recent action, Bellevue guards Wyatt Waterbury and Gino Costello led the Broncos to a 60-73 win over Climax, securing a third-straight SCAA West Division title. Waterbury paced the Broncos with 20 points, 6 steals and 4 assists. Costello added 14 points, and 4 assists. Carson Betz recorded a double-double, finishing with 10 points, 14 rebounds and 5 steals.

The team travels to Jackson Christian High School on Monday, Feb. 25 to open District play against Tekonsha.

In the girls most recent victory, Morgan Messenger led the way with 13 points as Bellevue defeated Waldron, 33-30. Mikayla Crawley finished with 10 points, 3 steals and 2 assists. 

The Lady Broncos host Colon on Saturday, Feb. 23, and finish off the regular season with home games against Athens on Tuesday, Feb. 26 and Tekonsha on Thursday, Feb. 28.

The team opens District play at Athens High School on Monday, March 4 against Battle Creek St. Philip.

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Eaton County

Eaton County

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Charlotte’s Camp Frances, and fans, are true treasures

Douglas M. Hoy
Contributing Columnist

Its name is Camp Frances and let me re-introduce you to this marvelous local facility, part of the past and the caretakers of its future. These two women are lifelong residents and are involved with its past and where the future may lead.
Mary Hall is a multi-decade Camp Frances board member and volunteer to many young women who have grown up in Charlotte. Likewise, Cathy Bogner also has lived in Charlotte all her life, been part of the Camp Frances heritage and is a devoted board member.
When Charlotte leased the land in 1954 to build Camp Frances, Mary Hall was not a member. Fortunately for the facility, in 1962, Mary sensed a need, became involved and would become one of the most-revered active board members. She originally was a volunteer as her first, then her second, daughter became a member of the Camp Fire Girls. Many young girls benefited from the facility during the time period from the mid-1950s to the early 1980s, as the Camp Fire Girls were a very sustainable organization in Charlotte.
I asked Mary where she obtained this overwhelming desire to help young girls. She quickly relayed the story of her time attending one of our, then local, country schools. Her graduating class consisted of six kids. Upon attending the seventh grade at our downtown “large” high school, she felt lost as the security of knowing everyone in her small country school was gone. Those early days of the seventh grade never left her. She always felt the isolation – not belonging to the larger student mass. This was a terrible feeling she did not want any young woman to experience.
Listening to Mary speak of her beloved camp, it was easy to become captured by her enthusiasm. It was easy to tell of her passionate caring for young women during that time period. And, in the end, all the stories came back to the young women. Many times she became lifelong friends with those girls whom she had helped. Being active and on the board of almost any worthwhile organization, these types of enduring bonds are just bound to happen.
Of course, the most heartbreaking recollection of her time connected with Camp Frances was the 1971 fire, which totally destroyed the building. However, in life much good can come out of such a terrible occurrence. As an active member of Camp Frances, she helped seek the backing of the most supportive Charlotte citizens, donations from various sources and help from local contractors. The new building was approved and built in record time.
Time moves forward and personnel naturally change. Cathy Bogner is the new chair of the Camp Frances board. Her roots and heritage are firmly ensconced within Charlotte. Cathy wants to keep the momentum moving, as the camp is constantly trying to achieve and maintain viability. As times have changed, the Camp Fire Girls Organization, along with the United Way, are no longer affiliated with our local hidden treasure.
Cathy also gave me an exceptional tutoring of the history of Camp Frances. But it’s the future where her interest lay. Like all other entities, the facility has bills to pay. The main source of income now comes from renting the building, the grounds, at a most reasonable price. Over the past few years, the area campgrounds located in Bennett Park have become most popular. This growth in Camp Frances’ reputation is not confined to just the summer months, as winter bookings are now becoming popular.
Cathy speaks of the future for the camp in most eager terms. She knows it will take work and a constant promotion, but that is simply what is required. It will not be easy, but Cathy says it will be done.
The board has much to promote. There is a 1,200-square foot building fully equipped with a full basement sitting on about three acres of land located in our own unique Bennett Park. For the rental fee, it is a most exceptional value. It is still thriving, thanks to women such as Mary and Cathy.
The Camp Frances Educational and Recreational Center can be found online at campfrances.org.

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Vermontville

Vermontville

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Hunters and community come together for annual buck pole

Amy Jo Parish

Contributing Writer

The corner of Nashville Highway and Ionia Road in Vermontville was packed with spectators and deer for the annual Maple Valley Community Buck Pole Nov. 15. The event takes place on the opening day of the whitetail deer firearm season and brings together hunters from across the region.

This year, 59 bucks were brought to the pole by hunters eager to show off their trophies and share their stories of bagging the bucks.

Duane Eldred, owner of Duey’s Corner store, organizes the event. He said the buck pole is a time when hunters can gather to share their stories, admire their deer and build memories that will last at least until the next hunting season. He is certain the social aspect of the evening is just as popular as the prizes awarded.

“When they leave, I want them to have had a great time while sharing stories with friends and neighbors, and if they’re lucky, they’re going to win something,” said Eldred. “It’s just a big huge deer camp for three or four hours; people just love it, and the comradery is just great.”

Along with a record number of bucks, the event also brought a record number of people – with nearly 300 crowding into the corner. The event began nine years ago with just 16 or so bucks, Eldred said. And he couldn’t be more pleased with this year’s results.

“It was just amazing,” Eldred said. “The turnout was just over the top; it just went right out the roof.”

He said a record number of prizes were given out this year, totaling more than $4,000. Each hunter who brought a buck to the pole received a ticket for a chance to win a prize. The top ranking bucks in the two categories – youth and adult – earned new firearms.

The generosity and enthusiasm of residents and area businesses is sure to keep the pole continuing well into the future, assures Eldred. Residents are already planning for next year’s event and are eager to volunteer their time to ensure its success.

“People have already asked to help next year,” he said. “It has been growing every year.

“People overwhelmingly want to help and donate. It’s just a great thing. I’ve never seen anything like it.”

The scoring was tight this year, with only half of an inch separating the top two bucks in the adult division.

At the end of the night, Callon Hoefler earned the youth category with an eight-point buck and Bryan Dunlap took home the adult category title, also with an eight-point buck.

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Potterville

Potterville

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New Potterville High School boys varsity basketball coach sets first camp

Newly hired Potterville High School boys varsity basketball coach, Jacob Briney, and his entire coaching staff, is offering a four-day basketball camp for area youth in second through 12th grade. The camp will be held four consecutive Sundays beginning July 21 in the Potterville High School gymnasium.

Students entering ninth through 12th grade will attend from 2 to 4 p.m. July 21, July 28, Aug. 4 and Aug. 11. Students entering sixth through eighth grade will attend from 4 to 5:30 p.m. and students entering second through fifth grade will attend from 5:30 to 7 p.m.

The cost of the camp is $50 per participant, which includes access to all four Sundays, and a custom Moneyball practice jersey. Checks should be made payable to Potterville Public Schools, attention Boys Basketball.

Registration forms must be completed before the start of camp and are available in the Potterville High School athletic office. There will also be an opportunity to register your child on Sunday, July 21 prior to the start of camp.

For more information, contact coach Briney via email at coachbriney@yahoo.com.

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Eaton Rapids

Eaton Rapids

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Eaton Rapids Photo club meets Jan. 14

A video titled “The President’s Photographer, Fifty Years Inside the Oval Office” will be presented at the Jan. 14 meeting of the Eaton Rapids Photography Club (ERPC). This video, presented by National Geographic, includes film clips on keeping U.S. presidents safe and secure. It then follows the president’s photographer, as he captures a behind-the-scene look at the everyday life of the American presidency and a chance to see what it’s like to cover the most powerful man in the world.
At the club’s November meeting, Paul Wegner entered a winning photo of a hand with a class ring into the “aging” category. Wegner’s black and white photo of a tree was a winner in the “open” category.
The Eaton Rapids Photography Club holds their meetings on the second Tuesday of each month from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Eaton Rapids Public Safety Building located at 101 Line St. in Eaton Rapids. Photo contests are also held each month, with categories provided by the club. Meetings also include presentations designed to inspire and motive those who have an interest in photography.
Anyone interested in photography is invited to attend, and all skill levels are welcomed. For more information, contact Charlene Shumaker at 269-763-3457.

Article submitted by ERPC.

Sunfield

Sunfield

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Mulliken

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Dimondale

Dimondale

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