Select Page

Communities

Latest

More

Latest

Blog Posts

latest

Declare this 4th of July

Sometimes I wonder if the Founding Fathers had any inkling that the 4th of July would become a day of national celebrating with fireworks, parades, and hotdogs. (I’m sure if they thought about future celebrations it didn’t...

Read The County Journal Online

Click to open a full digital copy of the newspaper that you can “flip” through online. Works on mobile devices! Read Digital Edition

Charlotte

Charlotte

Featured Story

New surgeon adds to patient first focus at HGB’s Eaton Regional Orthopedics

From a very early age Nicholas Doman knew the medical field was his calling. Growing up around his father’s family medical practice in Tecumseh, he was always drawn to the interactions his father had with his many patients.

As he progressed along his educational journey, it was clear that patient-focused care was his passion, and would ultimately guide his decision in where he would set up his practice. As an orthopedic surgeon specializing in anterior hip replacement, and reverse shoulder replacement, Dr. Doman’s skillset was highly sought.

Ultimately, Dr. Doman felt Hayes Green Beach Memorial Hospital presented the greatest opportunity to grow his practice and his family.

“The first time I came here, it was obvious the hospital was really focused on the patient experience,” Dr. Doman said. “I had that instilled in me at a very young age, that the patient comes first.”

Having found the right fit in a hospital, he and his wife, Jessica, had to find the right community in which to raise their 2-year-old son, Tyler. The two looked at a number of communities, including Grand Ledge and DeWitt before deciding Charlotte was the right fit.

“We both wanted to get back to a smaller town to raise our family,” Dr. Doman said. “We looked at other communities, but thought that none of them felt right. We needed to be in Charlotte.”

Jessica, who is into health and fitness, was drawn to AL!VE. The couple also saw plenty of opportunity to plug into the community.

“Growing up in a small town, my parents were both really involved in the community and I saw the value of being involved,” Dr. Doman said. “That’s something that I wanted to do here, and something my wife wanted as well.”

Jessica has joined the HGB Women’s Health Advisory Committee. On Tuesday, July 17 Dr. Doman joins Dr. Jeremy Pascotto at Eaton Regional Orthopedics, located at 616 Meijer Drive in Charlotte.

“Between the two of us we can offer any patient in the region high quality orthopedic care where they don’t have to leave the community,” Dr. Doman said.

Darice Darling, director of marketing and communications at HGB said the hospital is always looking at ways to improve patient experience.

“Having doctors who are very cognizant of how what they do assists patients, how it affects the patient is going to help us accomplish what we want to do as a hospital,” Darling said. “We can become a destination because patients know they are going to get that individual care, and have an experience here where they are treated well.”

Dr. Doman completed his orthopedic surgery residency at Henry Ford Macomb Hospital, including rotations for pediatric orthopedics at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and for orthopedic trauma at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta, Ga. He earned his medical degree from the Midwestern University Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine, and his bachelor’s degree at Adrian College in Adrian, Mich.

Dr. Doman is a member of the American Osteopathic Academy of Orthopedics and the Michigan Osteopathic Association.

Eaton Regional Orthopedics is located at 616 Meijer Drive in Charlotte, and is part of Hayes Green Beach Memorial Hospital’s health care system. Call (517) 543-7976 for more information. Most insurance plans are accepted.

Olivet

Olivet

Featured Story

Olivet College camp offers tournaments and clinics for young wrestlers

Sunday, June 24 through Tuesday, June 26 Olivet College hosted the annual summer wrestling camp. Directed by Olivet College head wrestling coach Brandon Brissette, student wrestlers from around the state attended to receive top-notch instruction, attend clinics with well-known wrestlers, and participate in tournaments. Just over 100 students from elementary school to high school ages attended the 2018 camp, and Brissette believes it was one of the best camps they’ve had since he started as head coach 10 years prior.

The Olivet College wrestling camp has been going on since the late 1960s. The number of students who have attended the camp over the years has waxed and waned, but Brissette, and assistant coach Adam Wilson, have worked hard in the last few years to make the camp grow by offering a high quality experience that goes beyond their own knowledge and coaching. Counselors at the 2018 camp included three time NCAA All-American Bo Jordan from Ohio State University, NCAA All-American and World Team member Alec Pantaleo from University of Michigan, five time USA World Team member Dalton Roberts, and three time MHSAA champion Kanen Storr from Leslie High School.

One of the big selling points for the Olivet camp, according to Brissette, was hearing the testimonies of the guest counselors and clinicians. Not only did they share their wrestling expertise with campers, they also shared about their stories and life experiences, how mental fortitude helps on the mats, how to stay on top of academics while wrestling, and how to overcome various life obstacles by viewing them through the lens of wrestling.

Camp counselors were not the only diverse group at the camp, however. Many students from the greater Olivet area attended the camp, but there were also students from Indiana, Boyne City, Detroit, Jackson, and more. There was also a wide age range of students. Boys as young as five attended to try wrestling for the first time, and high schoolers attended to strengthen their method for collegiate level wrestling, as well as to tutor the younger students.

The legacy of the Olivet wrestling camp was present not only in the campers who attended, but also of the former campers who returned, some as parents of current campers, and some as instructors. Adam Wilson was one of those returning campers who attributed his position as assistant wrestling coach at Olivet College to attending the camp when he was a child. Brissette and Wilson have a few teammates who attended the camp when they were younger, and they’re further testament to the good the camp does to equip young men not only with good wrestling moves, but also with life skills and goals.

Parents and students interested in registering for the 2019 Olivet College Wrestling camp can visit olivetcomets.com next spring for more information.

Advertisement: Readers: since many ads are from outside the local area, please know what you are buying before sending money.

Bellevue

Bellevue

Featured Story

Main Street Eatery opens in Bellevue

Monday, July 9 was the official opening of Main Street Eatery in downtown Bellevue. For several months Bobbi Easter and her team have worked to transform the small space on the east side of Main Street into a quaint and welcoming village diner and bakery, with home-style food complimented by Bobbi’s unique touches and twists. With a diverse menu and only a week of being open, Main Street Eatery has all the potential and new-business obstacles ahead of it.

The last hump before the restaurant’s opening was an inspection from the health department. By Friday, July 6 Bobbi’s anticipation was boiling over.

“We’ll be ready to open by tomorrow!” said Bobbi on Thursday, July 5.

“Ready” was a loose word as there was still some cleanup and setup to do before the neon ‘Open’ sign would be lit. Even after the opening there were still quirks to be worked out with the menu, with some items not yet available for visitors. Even so, the eatery was a longtime coming for the village of Bellevue, and it is already reflecting the original vision of Bobbi.

Homey. Diverse, home-style fare. Pictures on the walls. Bobbi Easter envisioned a pretty simple diner and bakery. There didn’t need to be a lot of flash and flair to the esthetic, but the menu needed to have her stamp of originality. The entirety of the experience also had to reflect the greater context of Bellevue, hence being named “Main Street” Eatery.

Main Street Eatery hits Bobbi’s vision and values well. The idea came to her, in part, because she was concerned about the lack of investment in Bellevue. Lack of money, business investment, and outside interest is what she and her daughters, Pam and Becka, identify as the primary causes of downtown Bellevue’s steady flat line and decline in recent years. But their concern didn’t end with negativity, rather it blossomed into action. Main Street Eatery isn’t just a vision for a small town restaurant. It’s part of a bigger vision for the future of Bellevue.

“My daughter and I have a dream for making Bellevue a destination village,” said Easter. “I just see the potential.”

Bobbi has a history as a starter and initiator. She’s owned her own bakeries and adult foster care homes in the past. She sees a need and follows through with a vision.

“You just need guts,” said Bobbi about opening one’s own business.

Having the “guts” is an inadequate way to describe Bobbi’s big dreams for her businesses and hometown. She has resolve, determination, a dream, hard work, and optimism. Those characteristics aren’t just the stuff of major athletes, artists, and public figures. They’re true of local business owners, neighbors, and bakers.

Readers are encouraged to visit Bellevue between the hours of 5:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. to grab breakfast or lunch at Main Street Eatery.

Advertisement: Readers: since many ads are from outside the local area, please know what you are buying before sending money.

Eaton County

Eaton County

Featured Story

2018 marks 150 years of the Fair at the Eaton County Fairgrounds

For the first 13 years of its existence, the Eaton County 4-H Fair took place just outside the Charlotte City Limits. That all changed 150 years ago when the Fair took up permanent residence at the Eaton County Fairgrounds.

To commemorate the event, the Eaton County Fairboard will be joined by local dignitaries Monday, July 9 for a special ribbon cutting ceremony to officially open the 2018 Eaton County 4-H Fair. The excitement though, will begin long before any scissor’s blade finds cloth.

Grandstand shows begin Friday, July 6 with harness horse racing, which continues at 11 a.m. on Saturday, July 7. The annual horse pulls take place Saturday afternoon, beginning at 4 p.m.

The Fair Board is excited to announce its newest grandstand event, the Super Kicker Rodeo, which takes place Sunday, July 8 at 7 p.m. Country music entertainer DeWayne Spaw kicks off a week’s worth of shows prior to the Rodeo, at 6:30 p.m. Spaw will perform Sunday through Tuesday evening, and Thursday through Saturday, July 12-14.

Elliott’s Amusements returns with its host of rides guaranteed to thrill and excite, and games ready to challenge even the most skilled on the midway. Rides open Monday, July 9 at 4 p.m., Tuesday, Jul 10 at 2 p.m., Wednesday, July 11 at 3 p.m., Thursday, July 12 at noon for toddler day, Friday, July 13 at 3 p.m. and Saturday, July 14 at noon.

The 4-H rings are being filled by eager youth anticipating the opportunity to showcase the hard work they’ve put in raising their livestock. Livestock exhibits get into full swing on Monday, beginning with swine showmanship at 8:30 a.m. The goat show begins at 9 a.m., followed by the Horse/Pony Pee Wee and Proud Eqestrians at 1 p.m.

Monday is also Veterans, Active Duty Military and Emergency Services Personnel Day, along with Eaton County Farm Bureau Day. Monster trucks will dominate the grandstands Monday, with a pit party planned for 6 p.m. and the Monster Truck show beginning at 7 p.m.

4-H horse and pony classes start the day off on Tuesday, July 10 at 9 a.m. Rabbit showmanship and breed classes also begin at 9 a.m. The dairy market show takes place at 9 a.m. Beef showmanship, breeding cattle, market classes and feeder and club herds take the ring beginning at 4:30 p.m. Sheep lead classes and the decorative class begin at 6 p.m.

The grandstands feature the TNT Demolition Derby Tuesday evening, beginning at 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday is also Kids Day, with rides for the little ones beginning at 2 p.m. Senior citizens also receive free gate admission Tuesday for Senior Citizens Day. Special events geared toward area senior citizens will take place at Kardell Hall between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.

The horse and pony classes, dairy showmanship, sheep showmanship, and poultry showmanship all kick off a busy day in the 4-H rings on Wednesday, beginning at 9 a.m.

STO Motorsports presents a thrilling evening of motocross racing in the grandstands, beginning with practice at 5 p.m. and competitions at 7 p.m.

Rides open at noon on Thursday, July 12 for Toddler’s Day (children 6 and younger). Toddler armbands are just $5 from noon to 2 p.m.

The horse and cattle arenas open for competition at 9 a.m. The big market livestock sale begins at 10 a.m. in the Wawiernia Pavilion.

Thursday is the also the first of two nights of truck and tractor pulls in the grandstands. Beginning at 7 p.m., Heavy Super Stock, Light Pro Stock, 2-Wheel Drive, Diesel Pickup, and Mini Mods will take the infield. The truck and tractor pulls return Friday, July 14 with Heavy Super Stock, Modified, Super Farm Stock, and 4-Wheel Drive Pickup competitions, also beginning at 7 p.m.

Cloverbud competitions take place throughout the day Friday in the 4-H arenas.

Saturday, July 15 is kids day starting at noon. Large and small animal showmanship sweepstakes round, and the small animal sale help round out 4-H activities for the week.

The week of activity concludes Saturday evening with another new event, the non-livestock exhibit auction, which takes place at 5 p.m.

The final night of grandstand entertainment features mud bogging by W. Michigan Mud Runs, beginning at 6 p.m.

For more information, visit www.EatonCountyFair.com.

Advertisement: Readers: since many ads are from outside the local area, please know what you are buying before sending money.

Vermontville

Vermontville

Latest

Vermontville

Featured Story

Continued support vital to Helping Hands Food Pantry

By Phil Grimwood

Helping Hands

As many of you know (and those who do not), Helping Hands Food Pantry has been serving the greater Charlotte community since 1982, (including the Vermontville and Sunfield areas) with the past 20 years at our current location on the corner of South Cochran and Shaw Street.

In January 2018, articles ran in the Lansing State Journal and Detroit Free Press detailing the tremendous amount of food assistance being distributed through our tiny building. Another article around the same time in The County Journal reported how we filled 5,316 household requests for assistance with more than 500,000 pounds of food and personal care items in 2017. It pointed out that 40 percent of our clients are disable, 37 percent are children and 13 percent are seniors, who often must choose between medicine, utilities and food. In addition to these documented numbers, 35 percent of people requesting assistance do so just once during the entire year. (Even though clients are allowed to frequent Helping Hands once every 30 days, only 2 percent will do so all 12 months of the year.) But then the following month a new batch of requests comes in from an entirely different audience, which tends to confirm the old adage that everyone eventually takes a turn going through a tough time financially.

In light of this, our Board of Directors has come to realize that future requests are unlikely to decrease and in order to continue to meet this documented need, we need to have a much larger, handicap accessible building with improved freezer and refrigeration capabilities to safely and efficiently serve our community. Thus far we have been unsuccessful in finding a suitable building or vacant property to build on and are asking for the community’s help in locating something. It seems like the building we need does not exist and (properly zoned) vacant land is nor for sale. And, whether we are able to find and rehab and existing building or purchase land and build, we also recognize that we will not be able to move forward without the financial support of the communities we serve. While we are still in the preliminary stages (a designated building fund has been established), we anticipate the need to raise approximately $300,000 to complete the task and assure the necessary tools are in place to serve the community for many years to come.

Our partners at the Greater Lansing Food Bank and the Food Bank Council of Michigan (both operate under efficiency and food safety guidelines set forth by Feeding America), will attest to the efficiency of our acquisition and distribution processes and how it sets a standard that other food pantries would do well to examine. (They are the food bank experts and have repeatedly expressed their astonishment of how effective and efficient our operation has become.) An outside audit has confirmed that approximately 85 percent of every dollar received in donations is returned to the community in direct aid. As an example, in 2017 we spent just under $72,000 on food that had a wholesale value of $812,000. Through these efforts we cannot only help people, but we can dot it for about 10 cents on the dollar. Even with this level of efficiency, without the proper tools (more space), our capability to meet this need will erode.

In closing, I ask you — Is this a service that you think should be continued in our community? If so, do you know a more efficient or equitable way of meeting this need? Will you share this information with others and help us to communicate what is at stake here? And finally, will you support us financially as we step up to this challenge?

Donations can be mailed to Helping Hands Food Pantry, 600 S. Cochran, Charlotte, MI 48813, made online at helpinghandsfoodpantry.org, or dropped off during regular operating hours — Tuesday 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Wednesday 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. or Thursday 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. If you would like to designate your donation to the building fund, please write, “building fund” on your donation. Designated funds cannot be used for any other purpose. Undesignated donations will be placed into the general fund.

Believing that transparency and accountability are essential to the sustainability of our organization, I am available to share the measures we take to be good stewards of the funds entrusted to us. I may be contacted through our website or email me directly at philipgrimwood@yahoo.com.

Advertisement: Readers: since many ads are from outside the local area, please know what you are buying before sending money.

Potterville

Potterville

Featured Story

Gospel Fest to bring nostalgia and music to Potterville

Fairs and carnivals are out. Music festivals are in. At least that’s the perception one might get from today’s younger generations. Music festivals big and small, folk and EDM, weeklong or weekend long are the rage, and it seems like local fairs and carnivals don’t have the same place they used to. Michigan itself is home to a number of notable music festivals like the Electric Forest Festival in Rothbury, to Charlotte’s own bluegrass festival. But in 2017 one of the County Journal’s communities tried something new, yet something classic and ole timey at the same time. A few creative citizens brought together a handful of oddball ideas into one music festival and carnival hodgepodge that’s become the heir of the beloved Gizzard Festival.

Gospel Fest is Potterville’s newest summer project; an opportunity to bring the family out for a taste of classic American music, while also enjoying the novelties of old American carnivals. Throughout June 8 and 9 Potterville residents, and visitors, can listen between two stages of music, while roaming through craft booths, food vendors, petting zoos, fair rides, and the modest downtown of Potterville. Both Friday and Saturday festivities take place between the hours of 11 a.m. and 9 p.m.

But Gospel Fest won’t just be an event of dusting off old hymns and gospel standards, or the same old same old fair attractions. The Gospel Fest stages will feature contemporary and local music acts like hip hop artist Elohin, as well as comedy from Will McDaniel. Saturday, June 9, from 3 to 5 p.m. there will be an Eaton County’s Got Talent competition, and there will also be a parade Saturday at 1 p.m. Local features and local participation are all included in the 2018 Gospel Fest.

For Clint Dickerson and the other Gospel Fest organizers, the 2018 festival is again about Potterville unity. It’s not lost on them that communities like Potterville are a mix of old and young generations that may not always have common ground in their town. Older folks wonder why teens want nothing to do with them, young families wonder what activities there are to do with their children, and teens and children just want food and excitement. Events like Gospel Fest are opportunities for the middle ground, where the older folks can hear the classic picking and strumming of that old time religion, and younger generations can wear off the school year blues with fair rides and cotton candy. Gospel Fest is a new idea for Potterville, but it’s a testament to days gone by where family, music, and community can all be part of the same event.

Gospel Fest is still in need of volunteers. To volunteer, readers can contact Clint Dickerson by calling (517) 285-2640. To participate in the parade or Eaton County’s Got talent, readers can also call Clint, or email pottervillegospelfest@gmail.com. For booth information, readers can contact Clarissa Newton by calling (517) 604-0390. Gospel Fest is a free, two-day event June 8 and 9.

Advertisement: Readers: since many ads are from outside the local area, please know what you are buying before sending money.

Eaton Rapids

Eaton Rapids

Latest

Eaton Rapids

Featured Story

Declare this 4th of July

Sometimes I wonder if the Founding Fathers had any inkling that the 4th of July would become a day of national celebrating with fireworks, parades, and hotdogs. (I’m sure if they thought about future celebrations it didn’t include the hotdog.) More so, I wonder if they assumed such a national holiday would become cheapened, not just by activities and leisure, but by the attitude of countrymen and women who despise each other, and have little respect for each other’s liberties.

I’ve written several columns about the current national climate, politically, societally, and indeed morally. I’m by no means an authority on these topics. Reporters, strictly speaking, aren’t necessarily authorities. But we are observers- observers of attitudes, patterns, communication, and happenings. As I continue to observe the national state of affairs, my optimism that our country can overcome its ideological, political, and philosophical divides continues to diminish…

Until I read about the lives, opinions, and positions of the Founding Fathers themselves, anyway. Those men who painstakingly drafted the Declaration of Independence, and carved the foundations of our democracy and freedoms out of human barbarism, were not always unified. Their opinions on government, loyalty, religion, public life, and indeed personal freedom were diverse and divided. They squabbled, bickered, and spewed vitriol at each other with a tenacity that would put today’s Twitter battles to shame.

In spite of their division, the Founding Fathers managed to find consensus in a few simple agreeances, that men shouldn’t live under tyranny, that citizens should be fairly represented, and that there should be a balance of power in government. That consensus was invariably tied to “self-evident” and “inalienable rights” of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” To reinforce their consensus and belief of human rights, the Founding Fathers declared that freedom of religion, of speech, and assembly were necessary possessions of their citizens.

The 4th of July is the day we as citizens of the United States celebrate a declaration of independence, not just in the form of a document sent to a British monarch over 200 years ago, but a continuing declaration for the ages that “all men are created equal.” We declare on the 4th of July that the United States of America is the land where the freedoms and rights we enjoy also belong to our neighbors, despite our disagreements with them, or differing lifestyles. July 4th is the time to remember that the Founding Fathers declared and made safeguards for citizens and people they did not know, for societies and generations they could not foresee, and for cultures that would grow and change throughout time.

This 4th of July let’s all take a moment not only to remember the boldness of the Founding Fathers and the sacrifice of those who have died for our freedom, but also to see the inherent dignity of people who are not like us. Take time to truly look at the heart of someone we see as a threat, or someone we disagree with, and honor that our founding declarations and documents protect them as well. Declare this 4th of July the one in which we choose to let diversity, differences, and yes, disagreements unite us, as did the Founding Fathers. Unity is not the same as conformity. True freedom is the acknowledgement that someone will use it differently than you, and maybe even in a way you dislike. Declare this 4th of July the one in which we renew dignity, honor, and respect for others.

Sunfield

Sunfield

Latest

Mulliken

Mulliken

Latest
Sorry, No Posts Found

Dimondale

Dimondale

Latest

Beloved Dimondale restaurant to reopen

With a sigh of relief and a round of applause, residents of Dimondale, and the surrounding areas, celebrated at Mike’s Village Restaurant Wednesday, June 27 as Lori Conarton announced she’d be reopening the Dimondale favorite....

Pin It on Pinterest