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Charlotte Athletic boosters has winning spirit

As we are all aware COVID-19 has affected each and every one of us in many ways. Not only has this pandemic affected each of us personally it also affects our local organizations. What I am here to talk about today is the...

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Eaton Rapids

Eaton Rapids

Featured Story

Wildside helps animals to survive

Deb Malewski
Contributing Writer

Covid-19 has caused an uptick in the number of animals brought to Wildside Animal Rehabilitation and Education Center in Eaton Rapids, according to Louise Sagaert, who runs the facility on Houston Road for native Michigan wildlife.
Sagaert has worked as a full-time special education teacher consultant for about 35 years.  “But it’s always been animals for me,” she explained.
A new record of animal admissions at Wildside has already been set for 2020; they’ve already seen over 1,900 animals, up from 1,600 in 2019.
“We are seeing things we might not normally see,” explained Sagaert, “due to more people being home and out in their yards much more.”
Over 950 cottontail bunnies have been rescued in 2020, up from the 500 in the past, she said.
“Sometimes a dog digs up the nest, or the lawnmower destroys the nest and the babies are discovered.”
The facility has a room dedicated to the cottontails with rows of cages, each filled with a family of rabbit “kits,” along with a 40-year-old human incubator that has been modified for baby rabbit use. Darlene Smith is the “Bunny Expert,” Sagaert explained, and has been a volunteer at the facility for over 20 years.
Possums are in the same situation, with a room dedicated to their care. Often their mothers have been struck by cars, but the babies survive. Possums eat ticks, and they get requests from people who would like possums re-homed on their property for this reason.
Even the larger birds, the raptors, have increased in numbers this year. With 120 raptor intakes so far this year, that’s twice what they normally see, Sagaert commented.
This time of year, we see a lot of ‘young and dumb’ with the raptors,” said Sagaert. These are young birds that are unsure of what to do or how to act and haven’t figured out how to survive on their own. They recently acquired an osprey from DeWitt, only the second osprey they have had in thirty years in rehabilitation. It was found in the road, not flying.
“The bird is doing fine and will be returned to his parents if he can fly in the flight cage,” Sagaert said.
“Raptors are the love of my life,” she said. If successfully rehabilitated, they are returned to the area that they originated from. So far this year they have released kestrels, red tail hawks, barred owls, bald eagles, hundreds of possums and rabbits, along with dozens of squirrels, Sagaert said.
A new addition to Wildside is a 120-foot-long flight cage on the property. The building allows the eagles to fly and condition their muscles before being released into the wild.
They have the funds to finish the flight cage but hope to add a treatment area on to the front of the building in the future. Due to the location of the flight cage at the back of the property, there is no water or electricity.
Newly admitted to Wildside is Valor, a bald eagle brought from the Muskegon area. He joins Patriot, a juvenile bald eagle from Grand Rapids.
The Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR) does not allow Wildside to accept raccoons, due to the diseases that they often carry that are harmful to both humans and animals. Skunks and bats also are not admitted due to rabies fears.
They take animals in between 9 a.m, and 8 p.m.
Wildside does not receive any state or federal funding and is a 501(c)3 non-profit. The staff are all unpaid volunteers.
“We always need money,” “Sagaert said. “Any little bit can make a difference.”
You can contact Wildside on Facebook at wildsiderehab or call (517) 663-6153.

Mason

Mason

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Mason

Featured Story

Shop Local – Culligan Water Conditioning

Deb Malewski
Contributing Writer

Almost 60 years ago Philip and Phyllis Carey started a Culligan Water franchise in south Lansing. They’ve both passed now, but the business is still in family hands. Matt Carey, their son, has been part of the business since 1980 and now is the official “Culligan Man.”
“We’re a family-owned, local business,” Carey explained, “but with national backing from Culligan.”
The business serves all of Ingham county, most of Eaton County, parts of Livingston county, and the southern half of Clinton county.
Culligan of Lansing offers reverse osmosis water filtration, water softeners, whole-home systems, bottle-free coolers, bottled water coolers and drinking water filters.
Culligan will service all water treatment equipment, Carey said, any make or model. They will also test your water for free. These tests can determine what is in your water, including arsenic, chlorine, chromium-6, coliform bacteria, lead, magnesium, nitrates, radon, and hydrogen sulfide.
Soft water is water that contains few or no dissolved minerals, Carey explained. Water softening involves a process called “ion exchange.” Calcium and magnesium, which are “hard” ions, exchange with sodium or potassium (salt) ions, to eliminate impurities in the water.
In this time of social isolation, there still are situations in which someone needs to come into your home for service and repairs. Culligan service technicians perform all the standard safety measures, including washing their hands, not touching their face, and wear a mask and gloves while working in your home, Carey said.
“About 98% of what we do involves us going to the customer’s home or place of business, not so much them coming to us.”
Culligan Lansing has been rated 4.8 out of 5 stars on Angie’s List, and 4.6 out of 5 stars on Facebook reviews.  Leah Taylor, a customer, commented: “We have used Culligan for our water softener and drinking water for over 40 years!  Culligan is the most reliable company we deal with.  We give them 5 stars for each of those 40 years.”
For more information about Culligan Water Conditioning of Lansing, you can call 1-800-551-6005 or email matt@culliganlansing.com. Visit them on the web at www.culliganlansing.com or on Facebook at culliganLansingMi. They are located at 3460 Dunckel Road in Lansing.

DIMONDALE

Dimondale

Featured Story

The Village of Dimondale

Deb Malewski
Contributing Writer

“Dimondale is attractive because it has that charming small-town feel but it’s still close to all the amenities that you might need,” said Lori Conarton, owner of MorningLory Café and Bakery in downtown Dimondale, a popular eatery. “We really have the best of both worlds.”
Conarton has lived her entire life in Dimondale, as have her parents and grandparents, and believes in it so much that she opened her business there on Bridge Street.
“It’s a beautiful place, especially because of the parks. They are really utilized by the public and are extremely popular,” Conarton explained.
Dimondale is part of the Grand River watershed (an area that drains to a common point).
Danford Island Park is within walking distance of the downtown business district.
“A lovely little nugget of serenity,” says Gail Johnson in her online review of the Island Park. Not too long ago the original dam in the Upper Grand River was replaced by a “W” weir, which has made the river shallower and faster and allows for better fish passage. Smallmouth Bass, Common Carp, Bluegills, River Redhorse, Catfish, and more make up the healthy fish population here and provide for great fishing opportunities from shore or from the fishing pier.
The park also features an easy-launch system for canoes and kayaks. Rain gardens were installed to manage stormwater run-off in the park and colorful native plants can be seen in abundance in the summer months. Several small bridges add interest architecturally to the park.
Dimondale has a long history. The Potawatomi Indians had a permanent camp along the Grand River in the Dimondale area prior to the 1830s. They were forced west in the Indian Removal Act of 1830. Isaac Dimond arrived in 1848 and constructed a dam on the river and later a sawmill and a gristmill.
In 1856 the village was platted and named Dimondale after Dimond. The borders of the village create a rough diamond shape, also, when looking down from an aerial view.
1878 brought the arrival of the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railway to Dimondale, with a depot located near where the roundabout is now. The remains of the railway trestle still remain in the Grand River at Dimondale. Dimondale was incorporated into a village in 1906.
The village is comprised of .94 square miles, with .04 of that water. The 2010 census reveals that Dimondale has 504 households, with the average family size of 2.89 people. The median age for those living in the Village is 47 years old. The largest age group living in Dimondale are those who are 45 to 64 years of age; they comprise about 37% of the population.
Dimondale has many activities for residents. Thursday afternoons from June through October feature a well-attended farmers market. The market is known for its healthy and regionally produced foods and food products.
In October, the Great Race by a Dam Site will be held, a 5K run/walk which supports the Dimondale Park Development. This year, due to Covid-19, the race will be held virtually.
An historical walking tour has been mapped throughout the town. Signs highlight the history of the area, and QR codes, when scanned with a smartphone, provide both information and photos.
For even more information about Dimondale, visit their website at villageofdimondale.org/, contact the Village office at 136 North Bridge Street, Dimondale, MI 48821 or call 517-646-0230.

Eaton County

Eaton County

Latest

Eaton County

Featured Story

Charlotte Athletic boosters has winning spirit

As we are all aware COVID-19 has affected each and every one of us in many ways. Not only has this pandemic affected each of us personally it also affects our local organizations. What I am here to talk about today is the Charlotte Athletic Boosters which is the financial backbone for all of the Charlotte Middle and High Schools athletic programs. During the 2018-2019 school year Charlotte Athletic Boosters generously funded $30,500 in equipment and uniforms and $8,000 in scholarships. During the 2019-2020 school year $26,000 in equipment and uniforms and an additional $13,000 in scholarships were funded by the organization. Keeping in mind these amounts would have been more had we had been able to have Spring sports. The postponement of football and the unknown future of our remaining Fall athletic programs has also created a void for our organization to raise funds to financially support all of the athletic programs. Charlotte Athletic Boosters raises most of their money through our sales at concession stands. Every bottle of water, bag of popcorn, and slice of pizza purchased helps our athletic programs. Without concessions where will we raise the funds needed? Our annual reverse raffle held each year in May was cancelled last year due to COVID, this dealt a financial blow to our funds. In addition to the loss of our concession sales and reverse raffle we have also faced many unexpected hurdles with the planning of our annual golf outing. Due to COVID unfortunately many businesses are not financially able to contribute as they have in the past. Thankfully, we have been able to connect with several new businesses who have committed to providing prizes and sponsorships in addition to the many businesses who have contributed for the past several years. Every board member and trustee of the Charlotte Athletic Boosters organization is a parent, grandparent, and friend of a past or present Charlotte athlete. Our athletes and administration have been affected tremendously by the decision to postpone or alter these athletic programs both last year and this year. We have all felt the disappointment and have shed a tear over these decisions. We have all looked into the eyes of our athletes as they deal with their own emotions. As a community we can and will get through this together. The next time we are together at an athletic event remember to visit the concession stand or contribute to Charlotte Athletic Boosters as we will continue to support Charlotte Oriole Athletics. For more information and to offer support, please email: charlotteathleticboosters@gmail.com

Submitted by Charlotte Athletic Boosters

Onondaga

Onondaga

Latest

Onondaga

Featured Story

Shop Local – Culligan Water Conditioning

Deb Malewski
Contributing Writer

Almost 60 years ago Philip and Phyllis Carey started a Culligan Water franchise in south Lansing. They’ve both passed now, but the business is still in family hands. Matt Carey, their son, has been part of the business since 1980 and now is the official “Culligan Man.”
“We’re a family-owned, local business,” Carey explained, “but with national backing from Culligan.”
The business serves all of Ingham county, most of Eaton County, parts of Livingston county, and the southern half of Clinton county.
Culligan of Lansing offers reverse osmosis water filtration, water softeners, whole-home systems, bottle-free coolers, bottled water coolers and drinking water filters.
Culligan will service all water treatment equipment, Carey said, any make or model. They will also test your water for free. These tests can determine what is in your water, including arsenic, chlorine, chromium-6, coliform bacteria, lead, magnesium, nitrates, radon, and hydrogen sulfide.
Soft water is water that contains few or no dissolved minerals, Carey explained. Water softening involves a process called “ion exchange.” Calcium and magnesium, which are “hard” ions, exchange with sodium or potassium (salt) ions, to eliminate impurities in the water.
In this time of social isolation, there still are situations in which someone needs to come into your home for service and repairs. Culligan service technicians perform all the standard safety measures, including washing their hands, not touching their face, and wear a mask and gloves while working in your home, Carey said.
“About 98% of what we do involves us going to the customer’s home or place of business, not so much them coming to us.”
Culligan Lansing has been rated 4.8 out of 5 stars on Angie’s List, and 4.6 out of 5 stars on Facebook reviews.  Leah Taylor, a customer, commented: “We have used Culligan for our water softener and drinking water for over 40 years!  Culligan is the most reliable company we deal with.  We give them 5 stars for each of those 40 years.”
For more information about Culligan Water Conditioning of Lansing, you can call 1-800-551-6005 or email matt@culliganlansing.com. Visit them on the web at www.culliganlansing.com or on Facebook at culliganLansingMi. They are located at 3460 Dunckel Road in Lansing.

Charlotte

Charlotte

Featured Story

Charlotte Athletic boosters has winning spirit

As we are all aware COVID-19 has affected each and every one of us in many ways. Not only has this pandemic affected each of us personally it also affects our local organizations. What I am here to talk about today is the Charlotte Athletic Boosters which is the financial backbone for all of the Charlotte Middle and High Schools athletic programs. During the 2018-2019 school year Charlotte Athletic Boosters generously funded $30,500 in equipment and uniforms and $8,000 in scholarships. During the 2019-2020 school year $26,000 in equipment and uniforms and an additional $13,000 in scholarships were funded by the organization. Keeping in mind these amounts would have been more had we had been able to have Spring sports. The postponement of football and the unknown future of our remaining Fall athletic programs has also created a void for our organization to raise funds to financially support all of the athletic programs. Charlotte Athletic Boosters raises most of their money through our sales at concession stands. Every bottle of water, bag of popcorn, and slice of pizza purchased helps our athletic programs. Without concessions where will we raise the funds needed? Our annual reverse raffle held each year in May was cancelled last year due to COVID, this dealt a financial blow to our funds. In addition to the loss of our concession sales and reverse raffle we have also faced many unexpected hurdles with the planning of our annual golf outing. Due to COVID unfortunately many businesses are not financially able to contribute as they have in the past. Thankfully, we have been able to connect with several new businesses who have committed to providing prizes and sponsorships in addition to the many businesses who have contributed for the past several years. Every board member and trustee of the Charlotte Athletic Boosters organization is a parent, grandparent, and friend of a past or present Charlotte athlete. Our athletes and administration have been affected tremendously by the decision to postpone or alter these athletic programs both last year and this year. We have all felt the disappointment and have shed a tear over these decisions. We have all looked into the eyes of our athletes as they deal with their own emotions. As a community we can and will get through this together. The next time we are together at an athletic event remember to visit the concession stand or contribute to Charlotte Athletic Boosters as we will continue to support Charlotte Oriole Athletics. For more information and to offer support, please email: charlotteathleticboosters@gmail.com

Submitted by Charlotte Athletic Boosters

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