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Eaton Rapids

Eaton Rapids

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Eaton Rapids

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Marching Through History

Deb Malewski
Contributing Writer

Despite the high temperatures of the day, the Civil War Discovery camp sponsored by the Grand Army of the Republic Memorial Hall and Museum proved to be great fun and a great way to learn American history.
It’s the sixth year for this one-day camp. Fifteen children, ages 8 to 14, participated in this hands-on history lesson on Aug. 10 and discovered what a day in the life of a Civil War soldier might have been like.
Ten adults in period-correct clothing (including heavy woolen uniforms) provided the historical education. In the past, the event was held at the Grand Army of the Republic (G.A.R.) Island Park. Due to construction on the Island, the event was moved to Howe Field.
“We miss being on the Island, but this has worked out fine,” said Chris Allen, who coordinated the events of the day. Allen is the vice president of the Museum’s Board of Directors. He stepped up when Keith Harrison, the President of the Museum, had some health issues and was unable to attend. The city was helpful in accessing Howe Field, Allen said, which also has some construction going on.
The GAR Island Park has special significance to the GAR as it was the location where the Eaton County Civil War Veterans held their annual reunions from 1908 until 1929.
“We have a great group of volunteers. None of this would be possible without them,” Allen said. The volunteers are re-enactors from Jackson, Concord, Williamston, and beyond; most are members of Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War.
The children were invited to discover what a day in the life of a Civil War soldier might have been like. They practiced marching and drilling with wooden muskets, participated in a mock battle, learned about the food a soldier would have eaten and the items he carried with him.
Information about the role of women in the Civil War was highlighted during the day, with the stories of Annie Etheridge and Sarah Edmonds.
“What we hope to do is instill a spark of interest in history,” Allen said.
“They’ve been talking about it all week long,” said Kelly Caber, the mother of two campers from Springport, “especially about the shooting and getting money when they muster out.”
A highlight of the day for the campers was being able to fire reproduction Civil War-era muskets. Safety precautions are taken, which include the wearing of safety glasses and earplugs. Their excitement was obvious when a mock battle, using wooden muskets, was staged, the blue versus gray. Battle cries were heard and military strategies were used, but the Rebels were the clear winner of the battle.
“My favorite part of the day is seeing their faces light up when they fire a musket,” Allen said. “And when they argue over who gets to carry the flag in battle.”
At the end of the day, campers were “mustered out” of the military and received their discharge papers and $13 in “pay” back at the museum. The Museum plans on hosting the event again next year.
For more information about the Civil War Discovery Camp, contact the Grand Army of the Republic Memorial Hall and Museum by emailing garmichigan@gmail.com or calling 517-922-6427. You can find them on Facebook or visit their website at garmuseum.com.

Mason

Mason

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Mason

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Shop Local – Culligan Water Conditioning

Deb Malewski
Contributing Writer

Almost 60 years ago Philip and Phyllis Carey started a Culligan Water franchise in south Lansing. They’ve both passed now, but the business is still in family hands. Matt Carey, their son, has been part of the business since 1980 and now is the official “Culligan Man.”
“We’re a family-owned, local business,” Carey explained, “but with national backing from Culligan.”
The business serves all of Ingham county, most of Eaton County, parts of Livingston county, and the southern half of Clinton county.
Culligan of Lansing offers reverse osmosis water filtration, water softeners, whole-home systems, bottle-free coolers, bottled water coolers and drinking water filters.
Culligan will service all water treatment equipment, Carey said, any make or model. They will also test your water for free. These tests can determine what is in your water, including arsenic, chlorine, chromium-6, coliform bacteria, lead, magnesium, nitrates, radon, and hydrogen sulfide.
Soft water is water that contains few or no dissolved minerals, Carey explained. Water softening involves a process called “ion exchange.” Calcium and magnesium, which are “hard” ions, exchange with sodium or potassium (salt) ions, to eliminate impurities in the water.
In this time of social isolation, there still are situations in which someone needs to come into your home for service and repairs. Culligan service technicians perform all the standard safety measures, including washing their hands, not touching their face, and wear a mask and gloves while working in your home, Carey said.
“About 98% of what we do involves us going to the customer’s home or place of business, not so much them coming to us.”
Culligan Lansing has been rated 4.8 out of 5 stars on Angie’s List, and 4.6 out of 5 stars on Facebook reviews.  Leah Taylor, a customer, commented: “We have used Culligan for our water softener and drinking water for over 40 years!  Culligan is the most reliable company we deal with.  We give them 5 stars for each of those 40 years.”
For more information about Culligan Water Conditioning of Lansing, you can call 1-800-551-6005 or email matt@culliganlansing.com. Visit them on the web at www.culliganlansing.com or on Facebook at culliganLansingMi. They are located at 3460 Dunckel Road in Lansing.

DIMONDALE

Dimondale

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Dimondale

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Dimondale is in a Bit of a Pickle

Deb Malewski
Contributing Writer

Without much cost or rigmarole, Dimondale has created a new village craze: Pickleball. This has led to the formation of the Dimondale Pickleball Society (DPS). Its uniqueness brings a simple, inexpensive idea to Dimondale; an outdoor activity that also serves to reconnect with neighbors, and maybe even burn a few calories, too, after being shut away for so much of the last year due to COVID-19.
“Just what is pickleball?” many are asking. Pickleball combines badminton, ping pong, and tennis into one game. A pickleball court is slightly smaller than a tennis court, and two or four players play. Wood or composite paddles are used, along with a perforated ball, similar to a wiffleball. All ages can play.
Denise Parisian, Dimondale Business Association President, came up with the idea, and along with Ryan Whitehill, of EXP Realty and a former tennis pro/coach, and Camron Gnass, a talented graphic designer and the owner of Traction, worked together to make pickleball happen in the Village of Dimondale.
One of the first things they tackled was to recognize the resources available in the community.
The former basketball court, soon-to-be pickle court, was in disrepair, and Amanda Hayhoe, of Hayhoe Asphalt and Paving, stepped up with an offer to repair the court at no charge. It is now able to be used for both pickleball and basketball. This is not intended to be the permanent court. Fundraising will begin to pay for a more permanent installation.
Gnass used his talents to come up with a unique logo for the group. T-shirts were ordered, along with posters and banners. The t-shirts sold out almost immediately, and more are being ordered.
“Apparently there is not an overabundance of pickleball shirts out there, as we sold them to people from Chicago and Grand Rapids and college students, along with our own local sales,” Parisian said.
Whitehill agreed to teach free weekly pickleball lessons each Wednesday evening at 6 p.m. at the courts which are located at the corner of Jefferson and South Bridge Streets. You don’t have to be a village resident to attend. The net is up all day on Wednesday for open play for those with their own equipment. Parisian brings in paddles and balls around 5 p.m. for those who don’t have their own equipment, to have a little practice time before class. They have been averaging about 40 people each week for the class.
“With very little effort and very little cost on our part,” Parisian said, “everything is falling into place. Plus, people are having a great time!”
“The phones have been on fire since we started this. We’ve received an overwhelming amount of attention,” Parisian said. “The best part is that people are showing up to play.”
And it’s more than just learning a new sport, Parisian noted. People are making friends, exchanging phone numbers, and developing comradery amongst the players. It’s exceeding all her expectations for the project, she said, her voice bubbling with excitement.
“If it sustains itself, it will grow,” Parisian said. Up to this point, it has been self-funded by the founders of the DPS. Whitehill provided some good connections for the equipment needed and located some sponsors. A smaller children’s pickleball court was put into place so that their moms could play pickleball.
“We’ve had more than one volunteer offer to raise the funds needed for more permanent courts,” Parisian said. “When people see how much other people are enjoying the game, they are more willing to donate to the cause.”
Parisian also pointed out the Dimondale Farmer’s Market held on Thursdays is doing very well. “Last week we had over 500 visitors at the market. I think people are very happy to be outdoors.”
Find The Dimondale Pickleball Society on Facebook at DimondalePickleballSociety or contact the Dimondale Village office at (517) 646-0230 for more information.

Eaton County

Eaton County

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Eaton County

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Crandell Lake Studied for Aquatic Invaders

Deb Malewski
Contributing Writer
A pontoon in Crandell Lake has drawn some attention recently, as motorized boats, gas or electric, are normally not allowed on the lake.  On August 5, the Eaton Conservation District and Eaton County Parks will be performing a study of the lake and will be surveying the lake for invasive aquatic plants. Conservation workers and volunteers will be on the pontoon boat to determine what is growing under the water surface and if it should be there.
Crandell Park, a 432-acre Eaton County-owned property, is Eaton County Parks and Recreation’s newest property, located along M-50 just west of Stewart Road. The lake, a former gravel pit, measures almost 160 acres and has depths up to 35 feet. The park is still in the developmental stage but has had several upgrades recently, including a restroom, benches placed, and an improved parking area.
The researchers will go to several fixed GPS points on the lake to sample the plant life; these same points were surveyed in the past and will be used to make comparisons. The information obtained will help determine the health of the lake and reduces the probability of an exotic invasive species becoming a large, unmanageable population.
Some of the invasive plants they are hoping not to find are the Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum), the curly-leaf pondweed (Potamogeton crispus), Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata), Starry stonewort (Nitellopsis obtusa), and the European frogbit ((Hydrocharis morsusranae).
How do these invasive plants get into our local bodies of water? They might attach onto boats, trailers, motors, and fishing gear. Leftover live bait dumped into the lake might have the plant material with it. Plants can be tangled in fishing lines and cables, or even stuck on the soles of your waders. Your dog might have plant material trapped in the mud on its paws.
These plants can grow into dense mats at the surface and compete with the native plants for space and light. The mats create a poor habitat for juvenile and spawning fish and can destroy a lake’s ecosystem. Heavy plant growth can tangle fishing lines, clogs boat props, and restrict other activities like swimming and paddling.
The Exotic Aquatic Plant Watch Program (EAPW) is part of the MiCorps Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program (CLMP). Early detection and rapid response are critical to prevent the invasion of plants that may damage the environment.
If you would like more information about the program contact Sue Spagnuoluo at the Eaton County Conservation District Office by calling 517-543-1512 x5, or by visiting their website at eatoncd.org.

Onondaga

Onondaga

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Onondaga

Featured Story

Shop Local – Culligan Water Conditioning

Deb Malewski
Contributing Writer

Almost 60 years ago Philip and Phyllis Carey started a Culligan Water franchise in south Lansing. They’ve both passed now, but the business is still in family hands. Matt Carey, their son, has been part of the business since 1980 and now is the official “Culligan Man.”
“We’re a family-owned, local business,” Carey explained, “but with national backing from Culligan.”
The business serves all of Ingham county, most of Eaton County, parts of Livingston county, and the southern half of Clinton county.
Culligan of Lansing offers reverse osmosis water filtration, water softeners, whole-home systems, bottle-free coolers, bottled water coolers and drinking water filters.
Culligan will service all water treatment equipment, Carey said, any make or model. They will also test your water for free. These tests can determine what is in your water, including arsenic, chlorine, chromium-6, coliform bacteria, lead, magnesium, nitrates, radon, and hydrogen sulfide.
Soft water is water that contains few or no dissolved minerals, Carey explained. Water softening involves a process called “ion exchange.” Calcium and magnesium, which are “hard” ions, exchange with sodium or potassium (salt) ions, to eliminate impurities in the water.
In this time of social isolation, there still are situations in which someone needs to come into your home for service and repairs. Culligan service technicians perform all the standard safety measures, including washing their hands, not touching their face, and wear a mask and gloves while working in your home, Carey said.
“About 98% of what we do involves us going to the customer’s home or place of business, not so much them coming to us.”
Culligan Lansing has been rated 4.8 out of 5 stars on Angie’s List, and 4.6 out of 5 stars on Facebook reviews.  Leah Taylor, a customer, commented: “We have used Culligan for our water softener and drinking water for over 40 years!  Culligan is the most reliable company we deal with.  We give them 5 stars for each of those 40 years.”
For more information about Culligan Water Conditioning of Lansing, you can call 1-800-551-6005 or email matt@culliganlansing.com. Visit them on the web at www.culliganlansing.com or on Facebook at culliganLansingMi. They are located at 3460 Dunckel Road in Lansing.

Charlotte

Charlotte

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Charlotte

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They Found Love At Sidestreets

Deb Malewski
Contributing Writer

Sidestreets Deli, Charlotte’s own New York-style deli, started out as an East Lansing deli in 1986 and opened a second location in Lansing in 1991. That’s where both Jay and Lindsey Hull were employed and started dating in 1995. Their manager at Sidestreets, the late Dennis Carter, always credited himself with being the matchmaker that brought the couple together. They married in June of 2001.
As part of their twentieth anniversary celebration, Jay planned a special trip down memory lane to surprise his wife. Their first stop was the Cooley Gardens in Lansing, where the couple tied the knot amongst the flowers. Charlar Place in Holt, now known as The Hidden Gem, was their next stop, which was where they held their reception.
The next destination was a real step back in time. The two Lansing area Sidestreets Delis are long gone, but they headed to Charlotte to visit their former employers, Dave and Rose McNamara, the founders of Sidestreets Deli in Lansing and East Lansing. The McNamaras now own just the one location in Charlotte. With perfect and lucky timing, both Dave and Rose were working in the store when the couple arrived and introduced themselves.
“I was in shock when I realized who they were,” David McNamara said. “I remember Jay, he was about 18 or 19 back then. It brought back a lot of memories from the old stores and the crazy things we used to do.”
“They still have the awesome cheese bread I remember,” Lindsey said. “It just made me realize that so many things have changed over the years, but some things still remain the same.” Lindsey was a social work major at Michigan State University when working at Sidestreets, and now is the Chief Executive Officer of Shiawassee Health & Wellness.
Sidestreets Deli was a great place to work, both Hulls stated, with a real family atmosphere.
The Hulls live in Perry now and have a 19-year-old son. McNamara urged them to get their son to apply to work at the deli, just like they did. “It would be fun to make it a generational thing, with the whole family working here at some point.”
The McNamaras have had other people come in and say that they worked for them in the past, but this was extra special with the two getting and staying married for 20 years, and dropping in to visit them, McNamara stated.
Sidestreets Deli is located at 116 South Cochran in downtown Charlotte.

Potterville

Potterville

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Olivet

Olivet

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