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Charlotte

Charlotte

Featured Story

Charlotte Athletic boosters has winning spirit

As we are all aware COVID-19 has affected each and every one of us in many ways. Not only has this pandemic affected each of us personally it also affects our local organizations. What I am here to talk about today is the Charlotte Athletic Boosters which is the financial backbone for all of the Charlotte Middle and High Schools athletic programs. During the 2018-2019 school year Charlotte Athletic Boosters generously funded $30,500 in equipment and uniforms and $8,000 in scholarships. During the 2019-2020 school year $26,000 in equipment and uniforms and an additional $13,000 in scholarships were funded by the organization. Keeping in mind these amounts would have been more had we had been able to have Spring sports. The postponement of football and the unknown future of our remaining Fall athletic programs has also created a void for our organization to raise funds to financially support all of the athletic programs. Charlotte Athletic Boosters raises most of their money through our sales at concession stands. Every bottle of water, bag of popcorn, and slice of pizza purchased helps our athletic programs. Without concessions where will we raise the funds needed? Our annual reverse raffle held each year in May was cancelled last year due to COVID, this dealt a financial blow to our funds. In addition to the loss of our concession sales and reverse raffle we have also faced many unexpected hurdles with the planning of our annual golf outing. Due to COVID unfortunately many businesses are not financially able to contribute as they have in the past. Thankfully, we have been able to connect with several new businesses who have committed to providing prizes and sponsorships in addition to the many businesses who have contributed for the past several years. Every board member and trustee of the Charlotte Athletic Boosters organization is a parent, grandparent, and friend of a past or present Charlotte athlete. Our athletes and administration have been affected tremendously by the decision to postpone or alter these athletic programs both last year and this year. We have all felt the disappointment and have shed a tear over these decisions. We have all looked into the eyes of our athletes as they deal with their own emotions. As a community we can and will get through this together. The next time we are together at an athletic event remember to visit the concession stand or contribute to Charlotte Athletic Boosters as we will continue to support Charlotte Oriole Athletics. For more information and to offer support, please email: charlotteathleticboosters@gmail.com

Submitted by Charlotte Athletic Boosters

Olivet

Olivet

Featured Story

Eaton County Sheriff’s Office has a new K9

Welcome your K9 Roscoe. We can’t thank you enough for the overwhelming response. It was wonderful. Roscoe was submitted by multiple people and was liked by Deputy Studley as well. “Roscoe” is also a name of an Anderson Co. (SC) Sheriff K9 recently killed in the line of duty. So we felt it was fitting to honor their dog. Studley and Roscoe will start training in October and be on the road as a team soon. The dog and training are being paid for by grant funds. The team will be trained in explosives and tracking.

Bellevue

Bellevue

Featured Story

Eaton County Sheriff’s Office has a new K9

Welcome your K9 Roscoe. We can’t thank you enough for the overwhelming response. It was wonderful. Roscoe was submitted by multiple people and was liked by Deputy Studley as well. “Roscoe” is also a name of an Anderson Co. (SC) Sheriff K9 recently killed in the line of duty. So we felt it was fitting to honor their dog. Studley and Roscoe will start training in October and be on the road as a team soon. The dog and training are being paid for by grant funds. The team will be trained in explosives and tracking.

Eaton County

Eaton County

Latest

Eaton County

Featured Story

Charlotte Athletic boosters has winning spirit

As we are all aware COVID-19 has affected each and every one of us in many ways. Not only has this pandemic affected each of us personally it also affects our local organizations. What I am here to talk about today is the Charlotte Athletic Boosters which is the financial backbone for all of the Charlotte Middle and High Schools athletic programs. During the 2018-2019 school year Charlotte Athletic Boosters generously funded $30,500 in equipment and uniforms and $8,000 in scholarships. During the 2019-2020 school year $26,000 in equipment and uniforms and an additional $13,000 in scholarships were funded by the organization. Keeping in mind these amounts would have been more had we had been able to have Spring sports. The postponement of football and the unknown future of our remaining Fall athletic programs has also created a void for our organization to raise funds to financially support all of the athletic programs. Charlotte Athletic Boosters raises most of their money through our sales at concession stands. Every bottle of water, bag of popcorn, and slice of pizza purchased helps our athletic programs. Without concessions where will we raise the funds needed? Our annual reverse raffle held each year in May was cancelled last year due to COVID, this dealt a financial blow to our funds. In addition to the loss of our concession sales and reverse raffle we have also faced many unexpected hurdles with the planning of our annual golf outing. Due to COVID unfortunately many businesses are not financially able to contribute as they have in the past. Thankfully, we have been able to connect with several new businesses who have committed to providing prizes and sponsorships in addition to the many businesses who have contributed for the past several years. Every board member and trustee of the Charlotte Athletic Boosters organization is a parent, grandparent, and friend of a past or present Charlotte athlete. Our athletes and administration have been affected tremendously by the decision to postpone or alter these athletic programs both last year and this year. We have all felt the disappointment and have shed a tear over these decisions. We have all looked into the eyes of our athletes as they deal with their own emotions. As a community we can and will get through this together. The next time we are together at an athletic event remember to visit the concession stand or contribute to Charlotte Athletic Boosters as we will continue to support Charlotte Oriole Athletics. For more information and to offer support, please email: charlotteathleticboosters@gmail.com

Submitted by Charlotte Athletic Boosters

Vermontville

Vermontville

Featured Story

Eaton County Sheriff’s Office has a new K9

Welcome your K9 Roscoe. We can’t thank you enough for the overwhelming response. It was wonderful. Roscoe was submitted by multiple people and was liked by Deputy Studley as well. “Roscoe” is also a name of an Anderson Co. (SC) Sheriff K9 recently killed in the line of duty. So we felt it was fitting to honor their dog. Studley and Roscoe will start training in October and be on the road as a team soon. The dog and training are being paid for by grant funds. The team will be trained in explosives and tracking.

Potterville

Potterville

Featured Story

Potterville City Park basketball court

Capital improvements within and around the City of Potterville are beneficial to our community, and help to draw visitors from nearby cities to Potterville to utilize the amenities and facilities we have to offer. We are currently working on planning projects in the heart of downtown Potterville – especially capital projects that provide beneficial perks to our residents.
We have four parks in the city; the one we are focused on for this capital project is City Park. The park’s downtown location makes it an ideal attraction. Not only is it connected via a tunnel to Potterville Public Schools, it is adjacent to M-100 where busy traffic from Grand Ledge or Charlotte enters the city. This park is utilized daily and features our Imagination Station, a wooden built playground structure.
Currently, City Park is the only park with a basketball court. In the past, the court was not maintained as it should have been, nor was it safe to use. The court had a drain in the middle, and sections of the concrete pad were heaving and rising, causing cracks to form and creating hazards for someone to easily trip or stumble. The hoops were located only on the north half of the court, leaving the south half an empty concrete slab that was not being utilized.
The proposed capital project was to install a 50 foot by 50 foot basketball court in the existing space with a concrete base, a basketball hoop with backboard, a key, and a three-point arch. After receiving bids for the project, the dilapidated basketball court was demolished, and the City moved to the next phase of reconstruction. Potterville’s school colors – maroon and gold – will be added to the concrete pad. The school colors are echoed throughout town, including other capital projects such as the water tower and the new city signs. It is a welcoming addition to the design of these projects.
Once completed, the new basketball court in City Park will be an inviting feature for the community. The safe and fun court will encourage more play for youth, residents and visitors alike. Conveniently located near two pavilions and a little league baseball field, newly planted grass will make this area look cleaner and have a smooth flow from one park amenity to the next. It will be a beautiful sight to attract traffic coming over the M-100 bridge.
Submitted by Aaron Sheridan, City Manager for the City of Potterville

Eaton Rapids

Eaton Rapids

Featured Story

Wildside helps animals to survive

Deb Malewski
Contributing Writer

Covid-19 has caused an uptick in the number of animals brought to Wildside Animal Rehabilitation and Education Center in Eaton Rapids, according to Louise Sagaert, who runs the facility on Houston Road for native Michigan wildlife.
Sagaert has worked as a full-time special education teacher consultant for about 35 years.  “But it’s always been animals for me,” she explained.
A new record of animal admissions at Wildside has already been set for 2020; they’ve already seen over 1,900 animals, up from 1,600 in 2019.
“We are seeing things we might not normally see,” explained Sagaert, “due to more people being home and out in their yards much more.”
Over 950 cottontail bunnies have been rescued in 2020, up from the 500 in the past, she said.
“Sometimes a dog digs up the nest, or the lawnmower destroys the nest and the babies are discovered.”
The facility has a room dedicated to the cottontails with rows of cages, each filled with a family of rabbit “kits,” along with a 40-year-old human incubator that has been modified for baby rabbit use. Darlene Smith is the “Bunny Expert,” Sagaert explained, and has been a volunteer at the facility for over 20 years.
Possums are in the same situation, with a room dedicated to their care. Often their mothers have been struck by cars, but the babies survive. Possums eat ticks, and they get requests from people who would like possums re-homed on their property for this reason.
Even the larger birds, the raptors, have increased in numbers this year. With 120 raptor intakes so far this year, that’s twice what they normally see, Sagaert commented.
This time of year, we see a lot of ‘young and dumb’ with the raptors,” said Sagaert. These are young birds that are unsure of what to do or how to act and haven’t figured out how to survive on their own. They recently acquired an osprey from DeWitt, only the second osprey they have had in thirty years in rehabilitation. It was found in the road, not flying.
“The bird is doing fine and will be returned to his parents if he can fly in the flight cage,” Sagaert said.
“Raptors are the love of my life,” she said. If successfully rehabilitated, they are returned to the area that they originated from. So far this year they have released kestrels, red tail hawks, barred owls, bald eagles, hundreds of possums and rabbits, along with dozens of squirrels, Sagaert said.
A new addition to Wildside is a 120-foot-long flight cage on the property. The building allows the eagles to fly and condition their muscles before being released into the wild.
They have the funds to finish the flight cage but hope to add a treatment area on to the front of the building in the future. Due to the location of the flight cage at the back of the property, there is no water or electricity.
Newly admitted to Wildside is Valor, a bald eagle brought from the Muskegon area. He joins Patriot, a juvenile bald eagle from Grand Rapids.
The Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR) does not allow Wildside to accept raccoons, due to the diseases that they often carry that are harmful to both humans and animals. Skunks and bats also are not admitted due to rabies fears.
They take animals in between 9 a.m, and 8 p.m.
Wildside does not receive any state or federal funding and is a 501(c)3 non-profit. The staff are all unpaid volunteers.
“We always need money,” “Sagaert said. “Any little bit can make a difference.”
You can contact Wildside on Facebook at wildsiderehab or call (517) 663-6153.

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