Select Page

Author: The County Journal

Red Rosie Bakery set to open in downtown Charlotte

Crissta Ames Contributing Writer When Colleen Armitage first moved to Charlotte from a town called Milan, just south of Ann Arbor, she felt a little lost after leaving her job, family, and friends. However, she decided to follow her dreams of opening a bakery and did so, right here in Charlotte. In October 2018, Red Rosie Bakery was officially opened, with influences from Armitage’s red hair, and her icon, Rosie the Riveter.  “Whenever I doubted myself, I could always remember her motto ‘we can do it’, so expect to see some WWII inspired themes,” she said.  She even got...

Read More

Ball Septic continues on under new ownership

Crissta Ames Contributing Writer For more than 25 years, Ball Septic Tank Service has been servicing Charlotte and the surrounding area septic tanks, both home and commercial.  The company was started by Ralph Ball as a side business. According to business manager Brandon Eldridge, Ball’s son, Steve took over in the 90s and expanded the business. In December, Ball Septic Tank Service was sold to current owner, Darrell Vanderstelt. Ball Septic does anything to do with septic tanks, but they also clean out grease traps.  “We install fields, replace tanks and fields. We can do repair work on the...

Read More

Cut-N-Tease Salon celebrates 10 years in downtown Charlotte

Crissta Ames Contributing Writer Laura Frazier, owner of Cut-N-Tease Salon, had always wanted to be a cosmetologist when she was little. After she went to cosmetology school in her mid-20s, she turned her passion into a business, one that is celebrating its 10th anniversary  The business started in a small building that once stood by the Burkhead-Green Funeral home on the corner of Sheldon and Lawrence. When that building had become available, her and her husband decided to go for it and start a salon business. With a growth of clientele, Laura moved the business to 229 S. Cochran...

Read More

Council votes 4-2 to not allow  recreational marijuana dispensaries

Crissta Ames Contributing Writer The Charlotte City Council made the decision on Monday to temporarily opt out of allowing recreational marijuana dispensaries in Charlotte. After Prop 1 passed in the 2018 elections, Michigan became the tenth state to legalize recreational marijuana for adults 21 years of age and older.  One of the factors going into the decision has to do with the state not yet having guidelines and regulations for cities who decide to opt in. Charlotte is the fourth city/township in Eaton County to opt out. The list also includes Delta Township, Eaton Rapids, and Grand Ledge.  Jennifer Domingue, associate attorney with the Cannabis Legal Group, offered insight into the licensing and allowance of marijuana dispensaries for when the council decides to revisit the topic. The Michigan Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act (MMFLA), signed into law in 2016, features five key categories: growers, processors, secured transporters, safety compliance facilities, and provisioning centers. According to Domingue, opting into the allowance of marijuana dispensaries would include a sixth category: microbusinesses. In order for marijuana dispensaries to obtain licensing, they must pay the municipality a fee up to $5,000 for application and renewal, and that licensing can be revoked or restricted very easily. She also mentioned, along with some Charlotte residents who were for the opting in, the opening of jobs and the regulation being safer than dealers who might be on...

Read More

The State of the Republic – An alternative view

By Mike Ranville “The President shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient.” Article II, Section 3, Clause 1. We are in the midst of that political season where presidents, governors and mayors deliver their annual State of the … messages. Originally intended to distinguish fledgling America from the British monarchy, the annual report to the people is now a staged political rally, each phrase in the message carefully weighed for its favorable impact on voters. Seldom is heard a discouraging word.               Armies of wordsmiths fashion meticulously-crafted litanies of accomplishments; real, embellished or fully imagined. Not surprisingly the message is often launched with an assurance that “The state of … is sound.”  In Michigan The State of … is not sound.  Approval ratings for the legislature are consistently low, and understandably so.  Two issues, from a list of many, help explain why; the corporate campaign money that drives the state’s political process, and the manner in which the will of the people has been relegated to little more than a clever turn of phrase to punctuate a 4th of July speech. Recent events illustrate the two are closely related.   While politicians in Lansing sanctimoniously rail against special interests —...

Read More

Pin It on Pinterest